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Global crime bust includes 70 in Sweden, 49 in Netherlands - Europol

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Officials from Europol, the FBI, Sweden and the Netherlands on Tuesday (8 June) gave details of the European leg of a global sting in which criminals were given phones that used encryption but which law enforcement officials could decode and use to listen in on conversations, Reuters, read more.

Jean-Phillipe Lecouffe, the deputy director of Europol, said at a press conference in The Hague that in all, law enforcement from 16 countries had arrested more than 800 suspects in 700 raids, seizing 8 tons of cocaine and more than $48 million in cash and cryptocurrencies.

"This international coalition...carried out one of the largest and most sophisticated law enforcement operations to date in the fight against encrypted criminal activities, Lecouffe said."

The officials did not break down all arrests in each country, but Swedish official Linda Staaf said 70 had been arrested in Sweden and a Dutch official said 49 were arrested in the Netherlands.

Staaf, the Swedish Police's head of intelligence, said that the operation had prevented 10 murders.

Countries involved included Australia, Austria, Sweden, Denmark, Estonia, Lithuania, Norway, New Zealand, Scotland, Britain, Germany, and the U.S., Lecouffe said.

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation was due to give further details of the operation later on Tuesday, but Calvin Shivers of the FBI's Criminal Investigative Division said in The Hague that in the 18 months leading up to the operation, the agency had helped distribute the phones to 300 criminal groups in more than 100 countries.

Police agencies then "were able to turn the tables on criminal organizations," Shivers said.

"We were actually able to see photographs of hundreds of tons of cocaine that were concealed in shipments of fruit."

EU

Keeping the UEFA EURO 2020 championship safe

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Between 10 June and 12 July 2021, Europol will host an operational centre to support safety and security during the UEFA EURO 2020 football championship. Coordinated by the Dutch Police, the International Police Cooperation Centre (IPCC) of the National Football Contact Points will host about 40 liaison officers from 22 participating and hosting countries. This special operational set-up is created to enable swift cooperation and provide the necessary operational support for a safe and secure championship.

The IPCC will serve as a central information hub for national law enforcement authorities. To that end, Europol has created a special Task Force EURO 2020 to enable keeping officers on the ground 24/7 to easily exchange information and swiftly receive leads on ongoing investigations. The operational activities will focus on public safety and criminal threats, which may threaten security during the tournament. Enforcement authorities will target threats such as cybercrime, terrorism, match-fixing, trafficking counterfeit goods including fake COVID-19 certificates, and other intellectual property crimes.

Europol’s Executive Director, Catherine De Bolle, said: ‘The UEFA EURO 2020 championship is a unique tournament both for football and for law enforcement. With 24 national teams playing in 11 cities across Europe, teaming up is paramount for the safety of the tournament. Europol will enable this cooperation by hosting the dedicated operational centre. Backed by Europol’s capabilities, officers on the ground will be better prepared to ensure a smooth and safe championship.’

The IPCC’s chief of staff, Max Daniel, said: ‘Combining information about public order issues, supporters, places of stay and travel movements by road, air and rail results in an up-to-date and integrated picture. Being able to easily share that information between countries has proven to be very valuable in the past. Police intelligence officers of all participating countries are doing their utmost to ensure that this unique UEFA EURO 2020 championship will be as safe as possible.’

IPCC UEFA EURO 2020 Participants (total number):

EU Member States: Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands. 

Non-EU Countries: Azerbaijan, North Macedonia, Russian Federation, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.

Organisations: INTERPOL and UEFA

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Crime

Security Union: EU rules on removing terrorist content online enter into force

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Landmark EU rules on addressing the dissemination of terrorist content online entered into force on 7 June. Platforms will have to remove terrorist content referred by member states' authorities within one hour. The rules will also help to counter the spread of extremist ideologies online - a vital part of preventing attacks and addressing radicalization. The rules include strong safeguards to ensure the full respect of fundamental rights such as freedom of expression and information. The Regulation will also set transparency obligations for online platforms and for national authorities to report on the amount of terrorist content removed, the measures used to identify and remove content, the outcomes of complaints and appeals, as well as the number and type of penalties imposed on online platforms.

Member States will be able to sanction non-compliance and to decide on the level of penalties, which will be proportionate to the nature of the infringement. The size of the platform will also be taken into consideration, so as to not impose unduly high penalties relative to the platform's size. Member states and online platforms offering services in the EU now have one year to adapt their processes.

The Regulation applies as of 7 June 2022. Promoting our European Way of Life Vice President Margaritis Schinas, said: “With these landmark new rules, we are cracking down on the proliferation of terrorist content online and making the EU's Security Union a reality. From now on, online platforms will have one hour to get terrorist content off the web, ensuring attacks like the one in Christchurch cannot be used to pollute screens and minds. This is a huge milestone in Europe's counter-terrorism and anti-radicalization response.”

Home Affairs Commissioner Ylva Johansson said: "Taking down terrorist content immediately is crucial to stop terrorists from exploiting the Internet to recruit and encourage attacks and to glorify their crimes. It is equally crucial to protect victims and their families from being confronted with crimes a second time online. The Regulation sets clear rules and responsibilities for member states and for online platforms, protecting freedom of speech where warranted."

This factsheet provides further information on the new rules. The rules are an essential part of the Commission's Counter-Terrorism Agenda.

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Crime

Customs Union: EU steps up its rules on cash controls to fight money laundering and terrorist financing

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New rules came into force on 3 June, which will improve the EU's system of controls of cash entering and leaving the EU. As part of the EU's efforts to tackle money laundering and to cut off sources of terrorist financing, all travellers entering or leaving EU territory are already obliged to complete a cash declaration when carrying €10,000 or more in currency, or its equivalent in other currencies, or other means of payment, such as travellers' cheques, promissory notes, etc.

As of 3 June, however, a number of changes will be implemented that will further tighten the rules and make it even more difficult to move large amounts of undetected cash. First, the definition of ‘cash' under the new rules will be extended and will now cover gold coins and certain other gold items. Second, customs authorities will be able to act on amounts lower than €10,000 when there are indications that cash is linked to criminal activity. Finally, customs authorities may also now request that a cash disclosure declaration be lodged when they detect €10,000 or more in cash being sent unaccompanied via post, freight or courier.

The new rules will also ensure that the competent authorities and national Financial Intelligence Unit in each member state have the information they need to track and tackle movements of cash that could be used to fund illegal activity. The implementation of the updated rules mean that the latest developments in the Financial Action Task Force's (FATF) international standards on combating money laundering and terrorism financing are reflected in EU legislation. Full details and a factsheet on the new system are available here.

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