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Golden Passports - 'Corruption in these schemes is systemic and requires a strong EU response'

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Cyprus has announced that it will abolish its citizenship-by-investment scheme as of 1 November 2020. The decision came after a documentary by the Investigative Unit of Al Jazeera showed through leaked documents and covert filming how the scheme was being used by criminals. The film showed how Cypriot business people and politicians were involved.

Asked about the film, a European Commission justice spokesperson said: “We watched in disbelief at how high-level officials were trading European citizenship for financial gain. President von der Leyen was clear when saying that European values are not for sale. 

“As you know, the Commission has frequently raised serious concerns about investor citizenship schemes, also directly with two separate authorities. The Commission is currently looking into compliance with EU law of the Cypriot scheme in view of possible infringement proceedings. We are also aware of the latest declarations of the government that you just mentioned. and expect the separate competent authorities to formally look into this case.”

Sven Giegold MEP called for the prompt initiation of infringement proceedings, saying: “The Mafia-like structures in Cyprus have not been crushed with the suspension of the passport sales.” 

Giegold has requested that the issue of 'golden passports' be added to the agenda of next week’s plenary of the European Parliament: “There are also similar programmes in other countries: Malta and Bulgaria also sell EU passports with questionable programmes. Considerable security risks also exist in connection with residence permits that can be purchased, so-called golden visas. The biggest seller of golden visas is Portugal, offering access to citizenship after six years.

“The Commission must take action against the sale of passports and visas with infringement proceedings in all relevant member states. The Council and the German government should speak out against the sale of citizenship rights.”

The Commission has looked into the growing trend in the EU in investor citizenship (“golden passport”) and investor residence (“golden visa”) schemes, which aim to attract investment by granting investors citizenship or residence rights of the country concerned. Such schemes have raised concerns about certain inherent risks, in particular as regards security, money laundering, tax evasion and corruption. However, granting citizenship remains very much in the gift of Europe’s individual member states and the EU cannot forcibly intervene. 

Transparency International Research and Policy Expert on Corrupt Money Flows Maira Martini said: “The allegations reach the highest level of politics in Cyprus and these must also be fully investigated, with no impunity for corrupt acts. We want to see a proper analysis of previously awarded passports and revocations, where necessary.” 

Transparency International EU Laure Brillaud Anti-Money Laundering Policy Expert said: 

“Yesterday it was Malta, today it is Cyprus, and tomorrow it will be another EU country’s golden visa programme under the spotlight. The problem of corruption in these schemes and their abuse is systemic and requires a strong response from the EU. We need a solid legislative proposal from the European Commission on how these programmes can be regulated until they are phased out.”

Economy

#COVID-19 - ‘This year’s Christmas will be a different Christmas’

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Today (28 October) the European Commission presented its proposals for additional measures to tackle the COVID-19 ahead of tomorrow’s meeting, via videoconference, of European heads of government. 

The measures are aimed at a more coordinated approach to data sharing, testing, medical and non-medical equipment, to travel, and to vaccination strategies. President of the European Commission, von der Leyen, called for cooperation, coordination and solidarity. 

Von der Leyen said: “Today we are launching additional measures in our fight against the virus; from increasing access to fast testing and preparing vaccination campaigns, to facilitating safe travel when necessary. I call on the Member States to work closely together. Courageous steps taken now will help save lives and protect livelihoods. No Member State will emerge safely from this pandemic until everyone does.”

Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Stella Kyriakides said: “The rise in COVID-19 infection rates across Europe is very alarming. Decisive immediate action is needed for Europe to protect lives and livelihoods, to alleviate the pressure on healthcare systems, and to control the spread of the virus.”

Professor Peter Piot, who is the lead scientist in the Commission’s panel of advisors echoed the President’s concerns, saying that there was no “silver bullet”. He said that Europe was paying a high price for relaxing measures in the summer, adding that measures like wearing the mask work as long as everyone does it.

He also warned against ‘corona fatigue’ and underlined that there was no trade-off between health and the economy. Pointing to a report in the Financial Times, he said that the health issue needed to be fixed to limit economic damage. 

The new efforts, look at many actions:

Improving the flow of information to allow informed decision-making: The sharing of accurate, comprehensive, comparable and timely information on epidemiological data, as well as on testing, contact tracing and public health surveillance, is essential to track how the coronavirus spreads at regional and national level and providing all relevant data to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the Commission.

Establishing more effective and rapid testing: The Commission is proposing directly purchase rapid antigen tests and delivering them to Member States, using €100 million under the Emergency Support Instrument. In parallel, the Commission is launching a joint procurement to ensure a second stream of access. Travellers should be offered the possibility to undergo a test after arrival. If negative COVID-19 tests are to be required or recommended for any activity, mutual recognition of tests is essential, in particular in the context of travel.

Making full use of contact tracing and warning apps across borders:  EU member states have developed 19 national contact tracing and warning apps, downloaded more than 52 million times. The Commission recently launched a solution for linking national apps across the EU through a ‘European Federation Gateway Service'. Three national apps (Germany, Ireland, and Italy) were first linked on 19 October when the system came online. The Commission calls on all states to set up effective and compatible apps and reinforce their communication efforts to promote their uptake.

Effective vaccination: The development and uptake of safe and effective vaccines is a priority effort to quickly end the crisis. Member States need to take to be fully prepared, which includes the development of national vaccination strategies. The Commission will put in place a common reporting framework and a platform to monitor the effectiveness of national vaccine strategies. To share the best practices, the conclusions of the first review on national vaccination plans will be presented in November 2020.

Effective communication to citizens: Clear communication is essential for the public health response to be successful, the Commission is calling on all Member States to relaunch communication campaigns to counter false, misleading and dangerous information that continues to circulate, and to address the risk of “pandemic fatigue”. Vaccination is a specific area where public authorities need to step up their actions to tackle misinformation and secure public trust, as there will be no compromise on safety or effectiveness under Europe's robust vaccine authorization system. 

Securing essential supplies: The Commission has launched a new joint procurement for medical equipment for vaccination.

Facilitating safe travel: The Commission calls on member states to fully implement the Recommendation adopted by the Council for a common and coordinated approach to restrictions to free movement. Citizens and businesses want clarity and predictability. Any remaining COVID-19 related internal border control measures should be lifted.

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EU

European minimum wage: Commission proposal welcome but falls short on ambition to fight poverty and inequality say Greens

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The European Commission has just released its draft directive on a European minimum wage. The proposal sets out minimum standards and uniform criteria for the level of EU-wide minimum wages. The European Commission is calling on EU governments to involve social partners and trade unions in negotiations on minimum wages and to close gaps where collective agreements do not apply.

For the Greens/EFA group, the European Commission's proposal falls short of its stated ambition to fight poverty and inequality. Kira Peter-Hansen MEP, Greens/EFA co-ordinator in the Employment and Social Affairs Committee in the European Parliament, said: "Too many Europeans earn a wage they cannot live on and the number of ‘working poor’ is likely to grow during the current COVID-19 crisis. That's why it's welcome that the Commission is attempting to tackle the issue of in-work poverty, but unfortunately this proposal fails to tackle the issue.

"If a European framework on minimum wages is to make a real difference then this proposal is not up to the job. As it stands, this Directive will still see workers on as little as two euros an hour. Wages must be enough to live on across the whole of the EU.

"We welcome the proposal to guarantee wages based on collective agreements in public procurement. However, more needs to be done to give social partners the means to strengthen collective bargaining and we need to secure that the proposal do not harm well-functioning collective bargaining models European workers need access to poverty-proof wages and for the eradication of discrimination of any kind, and for all EU citizens to have a minimum income - that’s what a true Social Europe is about."

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China

Samsung Display gets US licenses to supply some panels to Huawei

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Samsung Electronics’ display unit has received licenses from US authorities to continue supplying certain display panel products to Huawei Technologies [HWT.UL], a source familiar with the matter told Reuters on Tuesday (27 October).

With US-China ties at their worst in decades, Washington has been pushing governments around the world to squeeze out Huawei, arguing that the telecom giant would hand data to the Chinese government for spying. Huawei denies it spies for China.

From 15 September, new curbs have barred US companies from supplying or serving Huawei.

Samsung Display, which counts Samsung Electronics and Apple as major customers for organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display screens, declined comment.

Huawei was not immediately available for comment.

It is still unclear whether Samsung Display will be able to export its OLED panels to Huawei as other firms in the supply chain making components necessary to manufacture panels would also have to get U.S. licences.

Samsung’s cross-town rival LG Display said that it and other companies, including most semiconductor companies, need to get licences to resume business with Huawei.

Last month, Intel Corp said it had received licences from US authorities to continue supplying certain products to Huawei.

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