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Majority of EU citizens favor the euro, with Romanians most enthusiastic

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Three out of four Romanians favour the Euro currency. A survey done by Flash Eurobarometer found that Romanians overwhelmingly back the euro currency, writes Cristian Gherasim, Bucharest corrrespondent.

The survey was carried out in seven of the EU member states which have not joined the Eurozone yet: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Sweden.

Overall, 57% of respondents are in favor of introducing the euro in their country.

In a press release, the European Commission, the institution behind the survey, said that the vast majority of EU citizens surveyed (60%) believe that the changeover to the euro has had positive consequences for countries that already use it. 52% believe that, in general, there will be positive consequences for the introduction of the euro for their country, and 55% say that the introduction of the euro would have positive consequences for themselves as well.

Yet “the proportion of respondents who think that their country is ready to introduce the euro remains low in each of the countries surveyed. Around a third of respondents in Croatia feel their country is ready (34%), while those in Poland are least likely to think their country is ready to introduce the euro (18%)”, the survey mentions.

Romanians are leading in terms of an overall positive opinion regarding the Eurozone. Thus, the highest percentages of respondents with a positive opinion were registered in Romania (75% in favor of the currency) and Hungary (69%).

In all member states that took part in the survey, with the exception of the Czech Republic, there has been an increase in those favoring the introduction of the euro compared to 2020. The highest increases in favorability can be observed in Romania (from 63% to 75%) and Sweden (from 35% to 43%).

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The survey identifies some woes amongst respondents as possible drawbacks in making the switch to euro. Over six in ten of those surveyed think that introducing the euro will increase prices and this is the majority view in all countries except Hungary. The highest proportions are observed in Czechia (77%), Croatia (71%), Bulgaria (69%) and Poland (66%).

Furthermore, seven in ten agree that they are concerned about abusive price setting during the changeover, and this is the majority opinion in all countries surveyed, ranging from 53% in Sweden to 82% in Croatia.

Even though the tone is upbeat with almost all questioned saying that they personally will manage to adapt to the replacement of the national currency by the euro, there are some who mentioned that adopting the euro will mean losing control over national economic policy. Respondents in Sweden are the most likely to agree to this possibility (67%), while surprisingly those in Hungary are the least likely to do so (24%).

The general feeling is that the great majority of those questioned not only support the euro and believe that it would benefit their respective countries but that making the switch to euro would by no means represent that their country will lose a part of its identity.

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