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Fake news gaining momentum - Cyber Polygon 2020

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From common rumors to high-tech deepfakes: the experts will talk about the past, present and future of misleading news.

Vladimir Pozner and Nick Gowing will discuss the problem of fake news at the next annual online Cyber Polygon training, which will be held on July 8 of this year. The training is the official project organised by the World Economic Forum Centre for Cybersecurity and Sberbank Group with the support of INTERPOL.

Vladimir Pozner

Vladimir Pozner

The problem of disinformation on the Internet has become extremely relevant in recent years: it is being discussed by world leaders; in a number of countries, including Russia, special laws are being adopted; and platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Google and others are uniting together to combat online fakes. Fake news is causing serious damage to the world economy - according to experts, the global losses from such information attacks amounted to $78 billion in 2019. In Russia, this problem is also on the rise - according to a study by Medialogiya, in 2018, reports of fake news increased by 33% compared to 2017, and the total number of publications containing inaccurate information reached almost 21,000, which is 5,000 more than the year before

Nick Gowing

Nick Gowing

Experts predict that the development of technologies such as deepfake, or falsified audio and video footage, may further escalate the situation - Forrester estimates that losses from these types of attacks alone could exceed $250 million in 2020.

Vladimir Pozner, a renowned author with 50 years' experience in TV journalism, will meet with BBC's news presenter for 18 years and founder of Thinking the Unthinkable, Nick Gowing, at Cyber Polygon 2020 to discuss the impact of fake news on the wellbeing of businesses and entire nations. They will also share their vision of how disinformation will evolve and what needs to be done to address it.

In addition to the online stream, Cyber Polygon 2020 will also include a training exercise for technical specialists from major international corporations. The participants will develop a variety of skills: mitigation of cyberattacks, incident investigation, checking the IT perimeter for vulnerabilities, as well as collecting information about the attacks to be passed on to law enforcement agencies.

 

About BI.ZONE

BI.ZONE provides over 30 cybersecurity services, from cyber intelligence and consulting to incident investigation and response; develops its own advanced products and automated solutions for IT-infrastructure and applications security. BI.ZONE products help to automate detection and prevention of cyberattacks, while machine learning and artificial intelligence technologies allow to reveal attacks and fraud at an early stage. Official website: https://bi.zone.

 

EU

Parliament launches the Daphne Caruana Galizia journalism prize

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Maltese investigative journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia was murdered in a car bomb explosion in October 2017 

The European Parliament has launched a journalism prize in tribute to Daphne Caruana Galizia, a Maltese investigative journalist murdered in 2017. The Daphne Caruana Galizia Prize for Journalism, launched on the third anniversary of her death, will reward outstanding journalism reflecting EU values.

"The Daphne Caruana Galizia Prize will recognize the essential role that journalists play in preserving our democracies and serve as a reminder to citizens of the importance of a free press. This prize is designed to help journalists in the vital and often dangerous work they do and show that the European Parliament supports investigative journalists," said Parliament Vice President Heidi Hautala.

Prize money of €20,000

The €20,000 annual prize will be awarded as of October 2021 to journalists or teams of journalists based in the European Union. Candidates and the eventual laureate will be chosen by an independent panel.

Who was Daphne Caruana Galizia?

Daphne Caruana Galizia was a Maltese journalist, blogger and anti-corruption activist who reported extensively on corruption, money laundering, organised crime, sale of citizenship and the Maltese government’s links to the Panama Papers. Following harassment and threats, she was murdered in a car bomb explosion on 16 October 2017.

The outcry over the authorities’ handling of her murder investigation ultimately prompted the resignation of Prime Minister Joseph Muscat. Critical of failings in the investigation, in December 2019, MEPs called on the European Commission to take action.

Parliament strongly advocates the importance of a free press. In a May 2018 resolution, MEPs called on EU countries to ensure adequate public funding and to promote a pluralist, independent and free media. Parliament has once again underlined the importance of media freedom in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Watch the Facebook live interview about the Daphne Caruana Galizia Journalism Prize.

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Scotland extends hospitality restrictions until 2 November - PA Media

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Coronavirus restrictions in Scotland, which include the closure of pubs and restaurants in the central belt area and a curfew on indoor hospitality elsewhere, are to be extended until 2 November, PA Media reported on Wednesday (21 October), citing Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, write Sarah Young and Andy Bruce.

 

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Coronavirus risks running out of control in Germany, warns Soeder

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The leader of Bavaria’s Christian Social Union (CSU), Markus Soeder (pictured), warned on Wednesday (21 October) that the coronavirus is at risk of spiraling out of control in Germany, writes Paul Carrel.

While Germany’s infection rates are lower than in much of Europe, they have been accelerating and hit a daily record of 7,830 on Saturday, according to the Robert Koch Institute.

“Corona is back with full force ... the second wave is here,” Soeder told the Bavarian state assembly, adding caution and prudence were required.

On Tuesday, residents in the Bavarian district of Berchtesgadener Land went back into lockdown, the first area in Germany to do so since April.

Soeder said he nonetheless wanted to keep open borders with neighbouring countries. Bavaria borders Switzerland, Austria and the Czech Republic. He was also determined to keep the economy functioning and schools and nurseries open as long as possible.

“Our priority is to avoid a blanket lockdown,” he told the Bavarian state assembly, adding that he would introduce a “dark red” alert level with tougher restrictions for areas in Bavaria that have 100 new cases per 100,000 people over seven days.

Earlier, a spokeswoman for German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier said he was staying in quarantine at home until Oct. 29 after a bodyguard tested positive for the virus.

Steinmeier, whose role is largely ceremonial, has now twice tested negative for the virus, the spokeswoman added.

“There is light on the horizon,” said Soeder. “Of course, the vaccine will come, of course the situation will be very different in spring next year ... There is a tomorrow after corona.”

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