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China: Peak emissions before 2030 and climate neutrality before 2060

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Following the speech made by President Xi Jinping to the United Nations General Assembly on 22nd September 2020, the Energy Transitions Commission has provided the following response: “President Xi’s commitment that China will peak emissions before 2030 and aim for carbon neutrality before 2060 is a huge step forward in the fight against harmful climate change, and a welcome example of responsible global leadership. Strong policies and large investments. especially focused on the clean electrification of the economy, will be needed to achieve the mid-century objective. Analysis by ETC China have given us the confidence that a fully developed rich zero carbon economy is attainable. The priority now is to ensure that actions in the 2020s, and in particular in the 14th five-year plan, achieve rapid progress towards the twin goals.“ Adair Turner, co-chairman, Energy Transitions Commission. 

ETC Reports on China 

In June 2020, the Energy Transitions Commission (ETC) and Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) jointly released the report – Achieving Green Recovery for China: Putting Zero-Carbon Electrification at the Core.

In November 2019, the Energy Transitions Commission (ETC) and Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) jointly released -  China 2050: A Fully Developed Rich Zero-Carbon Economy.

About the Energy Transitions Commission 

The Energy Transitions Commission (ETC) is a global coalition of leaders from across the energy landscape committed to achieving net-zero emissions by mid-century, in line with the Paris climate objective of limiting global warming to well below 2°C and ideally to 1.5°C. Our commissioners come from a range of organizations – energy producers, energy-intensive industries, technology providers, finance players and environmental NGOs – which operate across developed and developing countries and play different roles in the energy transition. This diversity of viewpoints informs our work: our analyses are developed with a systems perspective through extensive exchanges with experts and practitioners.

For further information, please visit the ETC website. 

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Cambridge Wireless and Huawei partner to build the first private 5G testbed in Cambridge Science Park

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CW (Cambridge Wireless), an international community for companies involved in the research, development and application of wireless technologies, is teaming up with the global technology leader Huawei, to deploy and build Cambridge’s first 5G mobile private network within the Science Park.

The new set-up will allow Cambridge’s world-renowned technology community to undertake cutting edge new digital research and application in key areas such as autonomous vehicles, clean energy and remote surgery.

The 5G testbed will go live in January next year and kicks off a three-year partnership between Cambridge Wireless and Huawei, which will involve digital training, business support and joint events.

The aim is to explore how advanced wireless technology can have a far-reaching impact on both society and the economy.

“We are constantly working to provide value to CW members,” said CW CEO Simon Mead. “As home to one of the world’s most advanced R&D ecosystems, Cambridge is perfectly positioned for the rollout of next-generation wireless technology and we’re delighted to be driving this initiative with our partners. We hope to bring something unique to the Science Park to accelerate use cases and development of this technology. We invite ambitious businesses to get involved and through this exciting 3-year partnership with Huawei, we will support their 5G innovation journey.”

Huawei Vice-President Victor Zhang described the partnership as a key part of the business’s ongoing commitment to the UK. He said: “Huawei’s success is built on a relentless drive for innovation and we are able to keep pushing the boundaries of technology when we partner with those who share this ambition. The Cambridge eco-system is recognized as a global leader in technology and we are excited to work with the talent and vision in this eco-system. We hope to enable Cambridge Wireless members to reach new heights by allowing them access to our state-of-the-art equipment and markets including China and beyond. Our commitment to the UK and industry remains as strong as ever and we will continue to offer our expertise and technology to our partners to promote connections and innovation.”

The 5G testbed will be based at Cambridge Science Park, owned by Cambridge University, which is currently home to more than 120 tech companies and scale-ups.

Additional partnership with TusPark UK has been developed to accelerate the digitalisation of The Cambridge Science Park and enable businesses to exploit new capabilities, boost innovation and gain competitive advantage as they shift towards the adoption of 5G.

“We are looking for organizations that would like to create, accelerate and test out new and innovative applications and products on the CW 5G Testbed,” said CW Chief Commercial Officer Abhi Naha.

The 5G Testbed will be launched in January 2021. To find out more and how to get involved, please contact

 

Abhi Naha

CCO CW (Cambridge Wireless)

Tel: +44(0)1223 967 101 | Mob: +44(0)773 886 2501

[email protected]

 

- Ends -

About CW (Cambridge Wireless)

 

CW is the leading international community for companies involved in the research, development and application of wireless and mobile, internet, semiconductor, hardware and software technologies.

With an active community of over 1000 technology companies ranging from major network operators and device manufacturers to innovative start-ups and universities, CW stimulates debate and collaboration, harnesses and shares knowledge, and helps to build connections between academia and industry.

www.cambridgewireless.co.uk

 

About Huawei

Founded in 1987, Huawei is a leading global provider of information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure and smart devices. We are committed to bringing digital to every person, home and organization for a fully connected, intelligent world. Huawei's end-to-end portfolio of products, solutions and services are both competitive and secure. Through open collaboration with ecosystem partners, we create lasting value for our customers, working to empower people, enrich home life, and inspire innovation in organizations of all shapes and sizes. At Huawei, innovation puts the customer first. We invest heavily in fundamental research, concentrating on technological breakthroughs that drive the world forward. We have nearly 194,000 employees, and we operate in more than 170 countries and regions, serving more than three billion people around the world. Founded in 1987, Huawei is a private company fully owned by its employees.

For more information, please visit Huawei online at www.huawei.com

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Huawei supports open innovation to speed up tech development thus delivering high quality tech products into the marketplace

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Huawei Public Affairs Director Dave Harmon yesterday (18 November) addresed an EU-China research and innovation forum that was hosted by Ivo Hristov MEP and which was supported by STOA, the College of Europe and EU40.

Other speakers that addressed this forum included European Research Council President Jean-Pierre Bourguignon, Davide Cucino, the president Emeritus at the EU Chamber of Commerce in China and and Dr. Bernhard Muller who is a senior professor at the Technical University of Dresden.

Dave Harmon is director for EU Public Affairs at Huawei Technologies and he is a former member in the cabinet of the EU Commissioner for research innovation and science 2010-2014.  

Dave Harmon is director for EU Public Affairs at Huawei Technologies and he is a former member in the cabinet of the EU Commissioner for research innovation and science 2010-2014.

Dave Harmon said: “Huawei as a company supports open innovation and actions that back open scientific activities in Europe and across the length and breadth of the world. Programmes such as Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe are open by nature. This is the right political approach. This is because it will ensure that the best scientists across the world can and will work together in common cause to translate scientific effort into solutions for society. Science initiatives that are open will speed up the process of innovation. We are living through a digital transformation. ICT solutions are now modernizing different economic sectors across society and in a very speedy manner.

"The EU and China work on many common research initiatives including within the areas of urbanisation, agriculture, transport, aviation and health and the ICT sector underpins much of the collaborative actions within these policy spheres. This approach is enshrined within the framework agreements that the EU has with China that cover the science and technology sectors. Moreover, the EU Joint Research Centre has an MOU with the Chinese Academy of Sciences to work together on scientific advancement covering the transport, environment and agriculture sectors. The EU and China also has an innovation dialogue in place that is promoting higher levels of co-operation between the public and private sectors within the innovation policy space.

"China is now spending 2.5% GDP on research and development activities. This is ensuring that Chinese scientists can support global research measures that are successfully tackling the grand challenges that society faces today. Programmes such the EU-China mechanism for research and innovation that is administered by the Chinese ministry of science and Technology are ensuring higher levels of involvement from EU scientists in Chinese led research schemes. The European Commission sponsored Enrich initiative is also promoting higher levels of collaborative engagement between EU and Chinese researchers and business innovators alike.

"Huawei is an EU company. Huawei is deeply embedded within the ICT research eco-system. The company set up our first research centre in Sweden in the year 2000. Huawei has 230 technology partnerships with EU research institutes and collaborative arrangements with over 150 universities in Europe.

"Europe has great expertise and capabilities within the software engineering arena. Huawei, as a company ranks 5th in the 2019 European Commission Industrial Scoreboard for [email protected] Huawei has been an active participant in both FP7 and in Horizon 2020.

"Huawei is in a strong position to implement the policy goals of the European Union. International collaboration is a vital component within the research strategic space so as to ensure that EU policy objectives are fully implemented. Huawei wants to actively enable EU research and innovation actions under Horizon Europe and in particular in areas that will focus on the development of smart networks and services and the key digital technologies of the future.

"Moreover, there must be a stronger emphasis on green and environmental research at the basic and applied levels of scientific engagement. This will ensure that climate action targets will be reached and that the UN Sustainable Development Goals will be fully implemented.”

Dave Harmon is director for EU Public Affairs at Huawei Technologies and he is a former member in the cabinet of the EU Commissioner for research innovation and science 2010-2014.  

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UK should revisit 5G ban now Trump is defeated, says Huawei

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The UK should revisit its decision to ban the Chinese telecoms equipment maker Huawei from its 5G network in the post-Trump era and recognize that it will worsen England’s north-south divide, the vice-president of Huawei has said. Victor Zhang’s intervention comes as Boris Johnson prepares on Monday to meet the Northern Research Group, the lobby group of Conservative MPs determined to turn the prime minister’s levelling up agenda into a reality, writes Patrick Wintour.

Zhang urged the UK to stay true to its roots as the birthplace of the first Industrial Revolution, saying the government could not afford to fall behind in the 5G revolution. In July the UK government, after pressure from the Trump administration, reversed a plan to let Huawei be a controlled 5G supplier, and instead ordered Huawei equipment be stripped out of the country’s 5G networks by 2027. Ministers at the time said the reversal was not caused by a new security services analysis of the security threat posed by Huawei, but by the Trump administration’s decision to block US conductors being used by Huawei.

Zhang said: “The decision is going to have a huge economic impact on the UK. The UK wants to see a balance of investment between London, the south-east, the Midlands and the north of England. World-class connectivity is crucial to this objective, and without that it is very difficult to close the gap in the economic imbalance in the UK.” Victor Zhang Huawei’s vice-president, Victor Zhang, giving evidence to the science and technology select committee in July.

He added: “The government itself has said it will lead to a three-year delay in the rollout of 5G, and this will have a huge economic impact. Many people are surprised by the scale of the impact of this delay. Third-party research by Assembly, an independent research firm, shows this delay will have an £18.2bn impact. “The research shows it will widen the north-south digital divide. In the north, the broadband carriage and speeds are already far behind London and the south-east. The delay in developing 5G will worsen the situation. The government is committed to superfast broadband by 2025, and with this decision the objective of levelling up becomes unachievable.”

If 5G were delivered nationwide without delay, three-quarters of its expected economic benefit would be likely to come in regions outside London and the south-east. Urging ministers to revisit the decision, Zhang said: “I hope the government will keep an open mind and, once they review the economic consequences, look to see if there is a better way forward.” He added: “As a global company we want to work with governments to ensure they have the policies to secure growth. The decision was a political one motivated by US perceptions of Huawei and not those of the UK. This is not really motivated by security, but about a trade war between the US and China.”

He said he hoped the new US administration would adopt a different approach to that of Donald Trump. Zhang also expressed fears that the UK’s traditional role as an open, free trading nation was under challenge, and rejected claims that his company represented the “dragon in the nest”, a phrase used by the chair of the foreign affairs select committee, Tom Tugendhat. He said: “Something is worrying me about the UK because discussions here are focused on the geopolitical conflict rather than how to improve the UK economy and make sure the country grabs the opportunity again to be a global leader post-Brexit, at the end of this year. All this is vital for the UK’s recovery post-Covid and after Brexit – trade, technology, digitalization and how to attract foreign investment to the UK.

“The UK was the birthplace of the first Industrial Revolution and it was going to lead the digital revolution. The UK has the DNA to develop the right policies to seize leadership in innovation.”

Critics of Huawei claim that despite the independent shareholder structure, the company can be directed at any minute by the Chinese Communist party to give its regime a backdoor to spy on British communications. Zhang pointed out: “GCHQ concluded the technical risks were manageable and so did two parliamentary select committees. Personally, I don’t think there is a security reason for the UK to stop using Huawei. America put pressure on the UK through sanctions on Huawei, and the UK – impacted by these new, unjustified sanctions – responded.”

In August Washington announced that companies would have to obtain a licence before selling Huawei any microchip that has been made using US software or equipment. Zhang argued for the importance of 5G, saying it was a massive step up from 4G in terms of capacity, speed and volume. “This makes it essentially the foundation for next-generation technology – AI/robotics/smart healthcare and education … The fast speed and near-instant latency mean tech can talk in almost real time … Those who come earlier to this will have considerable advantages over those who come later.”

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