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MEPs call on European Commission to recognize nuclear as sustainable

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Nearly 100 MEPs have called on the Commission to follow the science and include nuclear under the Sustainable Finance Taxonomy. According to a letter sent to Commissioners, they urge them to be brave enough ‘to choose the path that their scientific experts have now advised them to take, namely to include nuclear power in the taxonomy’.

“The EU has just 30 years to decarbonize its economy in a sustainable way.  Achieving this means implementing policies which are solely based on science,” said FORATOM Director General Yves Desbazeille. “We need to be able to use all sources of energy which can help us reach our goals. Therefore, member states who wish to invest in low-carbon nuclear should not be prevented from doing so just because others are politically opposed to nuclear.”  

In the letter, MEPs draw attention to the fact that the scientific assessment of nuclear concludes that ‘the existing legal framework provides adequate protection in terms of public health and the environment’, ie nuclear complies with the requirements of the taxonomy. It therefore asks the Commission to take this scientific work seriously and not to discriminate against nuclear.  

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Whilst they appreciate the political pressure surrounding this topic, they express the hope that the Commission will be ‘courageous  enough  to  create  EU  regulations  that  do  not actively  generate  disadvantages  for  investments  in  nuclear  power,  or  any  other  fossil  free technology.’

About FORATOM: The European Atomic Forum (FORATOM) is the Brussels-based trade association for the nuclear energy industry in Europe. The membership of FORATOM is made up of 15 national nuclear associations and through these associations, FORATOM represents nearly 3,000 European companies working in the industry and supporting around 1,100,000 jobs.

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Electricity interconnectivity

Commission approves Greek measures to increase access to electricity for PPC's competitors

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The European Commission has made legally binding, under EU antitrust rules, measures proposed by Greece to allow the competitors of Public Power Corporation (PPC), the Greek state-owned electricity incumbent, to purchase more electricity on a longer-term basis. Greece submitted these measures to remove the distortion created by PPC's exclusive access to lignite-fired generation, which the Commission and Union courts had found to create an inequality of opportunity in Greek electricity markets. The proposed remedies will lapse when existing lignite plants stop operating commercially (which is currently expected by 2023) or, at the latest, by 31 December 2024.

In its decision of March 2008, the Commission found that Greece had infringed competition rules by giving PPC privileged access rights to lignite. The Commission called on Greece to propose measures to correct the anti-competitive effects of that infringement. Due to appeals at both the General Court and European Court of Justice, and difficulties with the implementation of a previous remedies submission, such corrective measures have not been implemented so far. On 1 September 2021, Greece submitted an amended version of the remedies.

The Commission has concluded that the proposed measures fully address the infringement identified by the Commission in its 2008 Decision, in light of the Greek plan to decommission all existing lignite-fired generation by 2023 in line with Greece's and the EU's environmental objectives. Executive Vice President Margrethe Vestager, in charge of competition policy, said: “The decision and the measures proposed by Greece will enable PPC's competitors to better hedge against price volatility, which is a vital element for them to compete in the market for retail electricity and offer stable prices to consumers. The measures work hand in hand with the Greek plan to decommission its highly polluting lignite-fired power plants by discouraging the usage of these plants, fully in line with the European Green Deal and the EU's climate objectives.”

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A full press release is available online.

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Biofuels

Commission approves one-year prolongation of tax exemption for biofuels in Sweden

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The European Commission has approved, under EU state aid rules, the prolongation of the tax exemption measure for biofuels in Sweden. Sweden has exempted liquid biofuels from energy and CO₂ taxation since 2002. The measure has already been prolonged several times, the last time in October 2020 (SA.55695). By today's decision, the Commission approves an additional one-year prolongation of the tax exemption (from 1 January to 31 December 2022). The objective of the tax exemption measure is to increase the use of biofuels and to reduce the use of fossil fuels in transport. The Commission assessed the measure under EU State aid rules, in particular the Guidelines on State Aid for environmental protection and energy.

The Commission found that the tax exemptions are necessary and appropriate for stimulating the production and consumption of domestic and imported biofuels, without unduly distorting competition in the Single Market. In addition, the scheme will contribute to the efforts of both Sweden and the EU as a whole to deliver on the Paris agreement and move towards the 2030 renewables and CO₂ targets. The support to food-based biofuels should remain limited, in line with the thresholds imposed by the revised Renewable Energy Directive. Furthermore, the exemption can only be granted when operators demonstrate compliance with sustainability criteria, which will be transposed by Sweden as required by the revised Renewable Energy Directive. On this basis, the Commission concluded that the measure is in line with EU state aid rules. More information will be available on the Commission's competition website, in the State Aid Register under the case number SA.63198.

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Energy

Biden administration aims to cut costs for solar, wind projects on public land

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Solar panels are seen at the Desert Stateline project near Nipton, California, U.S. August 16, 2021. REUTERS/Bridget Bennett
Solar panels are seen at the Desert Stateline project near Nipton, California, U.S. August 16, 2021. Picture taken August 16, 2021.  REUTERS/Bridget Bennett

The Biden administration plans to make federal lands cheaper to access for solar and wind power developers after the clean power industry argued in a lobbying push this year that lease rates and fees are too high to draw investment and could torpedo the president's climate change agenda, write Nichola Groom and Valerie Volcovici.

Washington’s decision to review the federal land policy for renewable power projects is part of a broader effort by the government of President Joe Biden to fight global warming by boosting clean energy development and discouraging drilling and coal mining.

“We recognize the world has changed since the last time we looked at this and updates need to be made,” Janea Scott, senior counselor to the U.S. Interior Department’s assistant secretary for land and minerals, told Reuters.

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She said the administration is studying several reforms to make federal lands easier for solar and wind companies to develop, but did not give specifics.

The push for easier access to vast federal lands also underscores the renewable energy industry’s voracious need for new acreage: Biden has a goal to decarbonize the power sector by 2035, a target that would require an area bigger than the Netherlands for the solar industry alone, according to research firm Rystad Energy.

At issue is a rental rate and fee scheme for federal solar and wind leases designed to keep rates in line with nearby agricultural land values.

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Under that policy, implemented by the administration of President Barack Obama in 2016, somemajor solar projects pay $971 per acre per year in rent, along with over $2,000 annually per megawatt of power capacity.

For a utility-scale project covering 3,000 acres and producing 250 megawatts of power, that is a roughly $3.5 million tab each year.

Wind project rents are generally lower, but the capacity fee is higher at $3,800, according to a federal fee schedule.

The renewable energy industry argues the charges imposed by the Interior Department are out of sync with private land rents, which can be below $100 per acre, and do not come with fees for power produced.

They are also higher than federal rents for oil and gas drilling leases, which run at $1.50 or $2 per year per acre before being replaced by a 12.5% production royalty once petroleum starts to flow.

"Until these overly burdensome costs are resolved, our nation will likely miss out on living up to its potential to deploy homegrown clean energy projects on our public lands — and the jobs and economic development that come with it," said Gene Grace, general counsel for clean energy trade group American Clean Power Association.

The renewable energy industry has historically relied on private acreage to site large projects. But big tracts of unbroken private land are becoming scarce, making federal lands among the best options for future expansion.

To date, the Interior Department has permitted less than 10 GW of solar and wind power on its more than 245 million acres of federal lands, a third of what the two industries were forecast to install nationwide just this year, according to the Energy Information Administration.

The solar industry began lobbying on the issue in April, when the Large Scale Solar Association, a coalition of some of the nation’s top solar developers - including NextEra Energy, Southern Company and EDF Renewables - filed a petition with Interior’s Bureau of Land Management asking for lower rents on utility-scale projects in the nation’s blistering deserts.

A spokesperson for the group said the industry initially focused on California because it is home to some of the most promising solar acreage and because land around major urban areas like Los Angeles had inflated assessments for entire counties, even on desert acreage not suitable for agriculture.

Officials at NextEra (NEE.N), Southern (SO.N), and EDF did not comment when contacted by Reuters.

In June, the Bureau lowered rents in three California counties. But solar representatives called the measure insufficient, arguing the discounts were too small and that the megawatt capacity fee remained in place.

Attorneys for both the solar companies and BLM have discussed the issue in phone calls since, and further talks are scheduled for September, according to Peter Weiner, the attorney representing the solar group.

"We know that the new folks at BLM have had a lot on their plates," Weiner said. "We truly appreciate their consideration."

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