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China leads world in new installed photovoltaic capacity

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China's new and total installed photovoltaic capacities had ranked the first in the world for seven and five consecutive years, respectively, as of the end of 2019, said Wang Bohua, vice chairman and secretary general of China Photovoltaic Industry Association, writes Ding Yiting, People's Daily Overseas Edition.

Wang announced the performance at the recent 5th China Photovoltaic Industry Forum (CPIF).

The country's production of polycrystalline silicon and modules production capacity also topped the world for 9 and 13 years in a row, Wang added, saying China would still keep its records this year.

It is reported that China's photovoltaic industry still kept stable growth in the first three quarters of this year despite the impacts from COVID-19 and the slump of global trade. The country produced around 290,000 tons of polycrystalline silicon, up 18.9 percent from a year ago. Module production capacity exceeded 80 GW, expanding 6.7 percent year on year. Besides, the country saw 18.7 GW of newly installed photovoltaic capacity, up 17 percent from a year ago, and the photovoltaic generation capacity has hit over 200 billion kilowatt hours, 16.9 percent more that in the same period last year.

China's photovoltaic industry has established a complete industrial chain that leads the world in technology, size and cost, said Li Qionghui, director of the new energy research department at the State Grid Energy Research Institute. According to her, the generation efficiency of China's photovoltaic industry has broken records for times, and the cost of photovoltaic systems dropped by over 90 percent than that in 2005.

"Chinese enterprises have made huge breakthroughs in photovoltaic technologies and cost in the past 10 years. The price of silicon wafer dropped to 3 yuan ($0.46) from around 100 yuan a decade ago, and the module price also went down from 30 yuan per watt ten years ago to today's 1.7 yuan," said Li Zhenguo, founder and president of LONGi Group, the world's most valuable solar technology company. The cost of photovoltaic generation is even lower than 0.1 yuan per kilowatt at places with high-quality sunshine, he added.

According to statistics from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), solar photovoltaics prices have fallen 82% since 2010 while concentrated solar power has dropped 47%. Onshore and offshore wind energy costs have dropped 39% and 29%. The prices will keep going lower in the next ten years, the agency forecasted.

In the first 9 months, the export of photovoltaic modules exceeded that from a year ago by 52.3 GW, said Wang.

The supply side of the photovoltaic industry was not very much impacted as China, the largest photovoltaic production base, had already controlled the spread of COVID-19 and fully recovered its industrial production in the second quarter, Zhang Senri with the China Chamber of Commerce for Import and Export of Machinery and Electronic Products told the People's Daily. The sound performance of the overseas market also contributed a big part, he added.

The annual installed capacity of this year is expected to stay on the same level with that of the last year due to the hot demand in the second half, he said, adding that the newly installed capacity might hit 110 to 120 GW. China's export of photovoltaic products will probably grow by over 20% this year, he noted.

"The prospering global photovoltaic market is an irreversible trend, and there are huge emerging markets waiting to be explored by Chinese enterprises," Zhang said.

As enterprises constantly improve their supply capacity and optimize products, China's photovoltaic industry will surely lead a clean way of global power energy through its strategy of "going global."

China

Independent pandemic review panel critical of China and WHO delays

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An independent panel said on Monday (18 January) that Chinese officials could have applied public health measures more forcefully in January to curb the initial COVID-19 outbreak, and criticized the World Health Organization (WHO) for not declaring an international emergency until 30 January, writes .

The experts reviewing the global handling of the pandemic, led by former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark and former Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, called for reforms to the Geneva-based United Nations agency.Their interim report was published hours after the WHO’s top emergency expert, Mike Ryan, said that global deaths from COVID-19 were expected to top 100,000 per week “very soon”.

“What is clear to the Panel is that public health measures could have been applied more forcefully by local and national health authorities in China in January,” the report said, referring to the initial outbreak of the new disease in the central city of Wuhan, in Hubei province.

As evidence emerged of human-to-human transmission, “in far too many countries, this signal was ignored”, it added.

Specifically, it questioned why the WHO’s Emergency Committee did not meet until the third week of January and did not declare an international emergency until its second meeting on Jan. 30.

“Although the term pandemic is neither used nor defined in the International Health Regulations (2005), its use does serve to focus attention on the gravity of a health event. It was not until 11 March that WHO used the term,” the report said.

“The global pandemic alert system is not fit for purpose,” it said. “The World Health Organization has been underpowered to do the job.”

Under President Donald Trump, the United States has accused the WHO of being “China-centric”, which the agency denies. European countries led by France and Germany have pushed for addressing the WHO’s shortcomings on funding, governance and legal powers.

The panel called for a “global reset” and said that it would make recommendations in a final report to health ministers from the WHO’s 194 member states in May.

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Huawei

Sweden begins 5G auction despite Huawei protests

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Sweden’s communications regulator began its delayed auction of 5G-suitable frequencies, a move Huawei warned last week would have serious consequences as the vendor still had outstanding legal action contesting its ban.

In a statement, the Swedish Post and Telecom Authority (PTS) said its auction for licences in the 3.5GHz band started today (19 January) with a 2.3GHz sale to follow. It is auctioning 320MHz of 3.5GHz spectrum and 80MHz of 2.3GHz.

The start of the sale comes days after Huawei lost its latest appeal related to the imposition of auction conditions which ban bidding operators using equipment from it or rival ZTE.

Huawei has two other pieces of legal action on the issue outstanding.

In a comment to Mobile World Live issued on 15 January following the failure of its latest appeal, a Huawei representative confirmed its “two main” court cases on the issue were not expected to be ruled on until the end of April.

The company added: “It leads to serious consequences to hold the 5G auction while the conditions for PTS decisions are subject to legal review.”

Sweden’s spectrum auction was originally meant to take place in November 2020, but was postponed after a court suspended the application some of the divisive terms of sale pending a hearing into them.

PTS’ terms were subsequently cleared by the court of appeal, opening the way for the auction to proceeded.

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General

The best of 5G is yet to come  

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Executives from leading mobile operators have urged consumers to be patient with 5G, explaining more advanced capabilities and use cases will become available as the technology evolves.

Speaking at the recent industry conference CES 2021, Drew Blackard, VP of product management at Samsung Electronics America (SEA), told a panel that many current services including video streaming are merely “better on 5G”.

But he added more advanced “only-on-5G experiences” will become mainstream “more and more as the infrastructure develops” and the technology becomes more widely used.

Blackard noted SEA had “done a lot of development with partners to build out what these can look like”, pointing to a collaboration with AT&T to offer AR experiences for sports fans.

Ice Mobility chairman and co-founder Denise Gibson added “there is an element of patience” to realising 5G’s potential.

She said 5G “is a platform that will evolve”, explaining “it’s not solely about” geographic reach, but also provision of advanced capabilities and services on networks and devices.

Blackard added “partnerships are obviously essential”, noting 5G required “a group, an industry to bring that forward. It’s not a single player that can do that”.

Commenting on the issue Abraham Lui, Huawei's Chief Representative to the EU Institutions,  said  "In Europe, the best of 5G is yet to come. As 5G deployment gathers pace across the continent, users will appreciate the benefits of this game-changing technology in the near future".

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