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EU and UK agreement on 2021 fishing limits: A promising sign of co-operation, but still falling short on the science says Oceana

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The EU and the UK have at last reached their first annual agreement concerning their shared fish populations, setting quotas for over 75 commercial fish stocks and adopting provisions for the exploitation of non-quota stocks in 2021. Oceana welcomes the willingness of both parties to co-operate but considers that some of the adopted measures fall short of ensuring the sustainable exploitation of common fish stocks.

“After lengthy and difficult negotiations, this first post-Brexit fisheries agreement is an important milestone, as only through cooperation can the EU and the UK address the management of their shared fish stocks” said Oceana Senior Director for Advocacy in Europe Vera Coelho. “But both parties are still repeating management errors of the past, such as setting some catch limits above scientific advice. If both parties want to lead on sustainable fisheries management internationally and help counter the climate and biodiversity emergencies, they must end overfishing immediately.”

A recent fisheries audit by Oceana shows that only around 43% of fish stocks shared among the UK and the EU are known to be exploited at sustainable levels, whereas the rest of the stocks are either overfished or their exploitation status is unknown. Yet there are still examples in this new fisheries agreement where scientific advice is clearly not being followed, as is the case with cod in the West of Scotland, herring in the West of Ireland or whiting in the Irish Sea, perpetuating overfishing of these stocks.

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The fisheries agreement for 2021, which is unprecedented in terms of the scope of the number of fish stocks covered, has been adopted under the principles and conditions established in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA). The agreed management measures will replace the current provisional ones set by the EU and UK individually to ensure continuation of the fishing activity until the consultations are concluded and implemented in the respective national or EU law.

Background 

The politically motivated setting of catch limits higher than recommended by scientists brings short-term financial gains to a few and devastating impacts to the rest. Overfishing is destructive for the marine environment, depletes fish populations and weakens their resilience to climate change. It also undermines the long-term socio-economic sustainability of the fishing industry and coastal communities on both sides of the Channel. Indeed, Oceana’s UK Fisheries Audit showed that when catch limits are set at or below recommended sustainable levels, fish stocks rebound, demonstrating the positive impact to be gained by following scientific advice.

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Oceana warns UK and EU must ‘walk the talk’ if new Brexit deal is to protect fish stocks

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Britain delays implementation of post-Brexit trade controls

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Britain said on Tuesday (14 Sseptember) it was delaying the implementation of some post-Brexit import controls, the second time they have been pushed back, citing pressures on businesses from the pandemic and global supply chain strain.

Britain left the European Union's single market at the end of last year but unlike Brussels which introduced border controls immediately, it staggered the introduction of import checks on goods such as food to give businesses time to adapt.

Having already delayed the introduction of checks by six months from April 1, the government has now pushed the need for full customs declarations and controls back to Jan. 1, 2022. Safety and security declarations will be required from July 1 next year.

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"We want businesses to focus on their recovery from the pandemic rather than have to deal with new requirements at the border, which is why we've set out a pragmatic new timetable for introducing full border controls," Brexit minister David Frost said.

"Businesses will now have more time to prepare for these controls which will be phased in throughout 2022."

Industry sources in the logistics and customs sector have also said the government's infrastructure was not ready to impose full checks.

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How the EU will help mitigate the impact of Brexit

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A €5 billion EU fund will support people, companies and countries affected by the UK's withdrawal from the Union, EU affairs.

The end of the Brexit transition period, on 31 December 2020, marked the end of the free movement of people, goods, services and capital between the EU and the UK, with adverse social and economic consequences for people, businesses and public administrations on both sides.

To help Europeans adapt to the changes, in July 2020 EU leaders agreed to create the Brexit Adjustment Reserve, a €5bn fund (in 2018 prices) to be paid until 2025. EU countries will start receiving the resources by December, following Parliament’s approval. MEPs are expected to vote on the fund during the September plenary session.

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How much will go to my country?

The fund will help all EU countries, but the plan is for the countries and sectors worst affected by Brexit to receive the most support. Ireland tops the list, followed by the Netherlands, France, Germany and Belgium.

Three factors are taken into account to determine the amount for each country: the importance of trade with the UK, the value of fish caught in the UK exclusive economic zone and the size of population living in EU maritime regions closest to the UK.

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Infographic explaining the Brexit Adjustment Reserve
Infographic showing how much support individual EU countries will receive from the Brexit Adjustment Reserve  

What can be financed by the fund?

Only measures specifically set up to counter the negative consequences of the UK’s departure from the EU will be eligible for funding. These may include:

  • Investment in job creation, including short-term work programmes, re-skilling and training
  • Reintegration of EU citizens who have left the UK as a result of Brexit
  • Support for businesses (especially SMEs), self-employed people and local communities
  • Building customs facilities and ensuring the functioning of border, phytosanitary and security controls
  • Certification and licensing schemes

The fund will cover expenditure incurred between 1 January 2020 and 31 December 2023.

Fisheries and banking sectors

National governments are free to decide how much money goes to each area. However, countries that depend significantly on fisheries in the UK exclusive economic zone must commit a minimum amount of their national allocation to small-scale coastal fisheries, as well as local and regional communities dependent on fishing activities.

The financial and banking sectors, which may benefit from Brexit, are excluded.

Find out more 

Continue Reading

Brexit

How the EU will help mitigate the impact of Brexit

Published

on

A €5 billion EU fund will support people, companies and countries affected by the UK's withdrawal from the Union, EU affairs.

The end of the Brexit transition period, on 30 December 2020, marked the end of the free movement of people, goods, services and capital between the EU and the UK, with adverse social and economic consequences for people, businesses and public administrations on both sides.

To help Europeans adapt to the changes, in July 2020 EU leaders agreed to create the Brexit Adjustment Reserve, a €5 billion fund (in 2018 prices) to be paid until 2025. EU countries will start receiving the resources by December, following Parliament’s approval. MEPs are expected to vote on the fund during the September plenary session.

Advertisement

How much will go to my country?

The fund will help all EU countries, but the plan is for the countries and sectors worst affected by Brexit to receive the most support. Ireland tops the list, followed by the Netherlands, France, Germany and Belgium.

Three factors are taken into account to determine the amount for each country: the importance of trade with the UK, the value of fish caught in the UK exclusive economic zone and the size of population living in EU maritime regions closest to the UK.

Advertisement
Infographic explaining the Brexit Adjustment Reserve
Infographic showing how much support individual EU countries will receive from the Brexit Adjustment Reserve  

What can be financed by the fund?

Only measures specifically set up to counter the negative consequences of the UK’s departure from the EU will be eligible for funding. These may include:

  • Investment in job creation, including short-term work programmes, re-skilling and training
  • Reintegration of EU citizens who have left the UK as a result of Brexit
  • Support for businesses (especially SMEs), self-employed people and local communities
  • Building customs facilities and ensuring the functioning of border, phytosanitary and security controls
  • Certification and licensing schemes


The fund will cover expenditure incurred between 1 January 2020 and 31 December 2023.

Fisheries and banking sectors

National governments are free to decide how much money goes to each area. However, countries that depend significantly on fisheries in the UK exclusive economic zone must commit a minimum amount of their national allocation to small-scale coastal fisheries, as well as local and regional communities dependent on fishing activities.

The financial and banking sectors, which may benefit from Brexit, are excluded.

Find out more 

Continue Reading
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