#DigitizeEU: Commission launches new plans to digitize European industry and research

| April 19, 2016 | 0 Comments

ethernetThe European Commission presented a set of measures to support and link up national initiatives for the digitisation of industry and related services across all sectors and to boost investment through strategic partnerships and networks.

The Commission also proposes concrete measures to speed up the development of common standards in priority areas, such as 5G communication networks or cybersecurity, and to modernise public services.

The Commission thinks that European industry across sectors and regardless of a company’s size must fully use digital opportunities if it is to be globally competitive. Traditional sectors (like construction, agro-food, textiles or steel) and SMEs are particularly lagging behind in their digital transformation. Recent studies estimate that digitisation of products and services will add more than €110 billion of revenue for industry per year in Europe in the next five years.

Commissioners presented their plan today:

Several EU member states have already launched strategies to support the digitisation of industry. But a comprehensive approach at European level is needed to avoid fragmented markets and to reap the benefits of digital evolutions such as the internet of things.

Andrus Ansip, Vice-President for the Digital Single Market, said: “The industrial revolution of our time is digital. We need the right scale for technologies such as cloud computing, data-driven science and the internet of things to reach their full potential. As companies aim to scale up across the Single Market, public e-services should also meet today’s needs: be digital, open and cross-border by design. The EU is the right scale for the digital times.”

Günther H. Oettinger, Commissioner for the Digital Economy and Society, said: “Europe has a very competitive industrial base and is a global leader in important sectors. But Europe will only be able to maintain its leading role if the digitisation of its industry is successful and reached fast. Our proposals aim to ensure that this happens. It requires a joint effort across Europe to attract the investments we need for growth in the digital economy.”

Elżbieta Bieńkowska, Commissioner for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, said: “The digital economy merges with the real economy. We need leadership and investment in digital technologies in areas like advanced manufacturing, smart energy, automated driving or e-health.”

 

Another important project launched by the Commission is the new European Open Science Cloud that will offer Europe’s 1,7 million researchers and 70 million science and technology professionals a virtual environment to store, share and re-use their data across disciplines and borders.

This will be underpinned by the European Data Infrastructure, deploying the high-bandwidth networks, large scale storage facilities and super-computer capacity necessary to effectively access and process large datasets stored in the cloud. This world-class infrastructure will ensure Europe participates in the global race for high performance computing in line with its economic and knowledge potential.

Focusing initially on the scientific community – in Europe and among its global partners -, the user base will over time be enlarged to the public sector and to industry. This initiative is part of a package of measures to strengthen Europe’s position in data-driven innovation, to improve competitiveness and cohesion and to help create a Digital Single Market in Europe.

Carlos Moedas, Commissioner for Research, Science and Innovation, said: “Our goal is to create a European Open Science Cloud to make science more efficient and productive and let millions of researchers share and analyse research data in a trusted environment across technologies, disciplines and borders. We listened to the scientific community’s plea for an infrastructure for Open Science and with this comprehensive plan we can get down to work. The benefits of open data for Europe’s science, economy and society will be enormous.”

The European Cloud Initiative will make it easier for researchers and innovators to access and re-use data, and will reduce the cost of data storage and high-performance analysis. Making research data openly available can help boost Europe’s competitiveness by benefitting start-ups, SMEs and data-driven innovation, including in the fields of medicine and public health. It can even spur new industries, as demonstrated by the Human Genome Project.

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Category: A Frontpage, Cloud computing, Data, Digital economy, Digital Single Market, Digital Society, Digital technology, EU, European Commission, European Structural and Investment Funds, Internet

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