Connect with us

European Alliance for Personalised Medicine

Making it happen with forward movement on health-care fragmentation: Defining the health-care ecosystem to determine value’ - EAPM report available

SHARE:

Published

on

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you've consented to and to improve our understanding of you. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Good afternoon, and welcome to the first European Alliance for Personalised Medicine (EAPM) update after EAPM’s successful 9th annual EU Presidency Conference, writes EAPM Executive Director Denis Horgan. 

To begin, the full report from the 17 September conference is available here.  The conference, EAPM’s ninth annual event during the ESMO Congress, brought together some 160 registered participants.

The report presents the key issues that were addressed in the meeting. After each section, the recommendations are included, and EAPM will be following up on these recommendations in the weeks and months ahead, with the various institutions at the EU and country level. 

The conference heard that as Europe begins to emerge from the pandemic and look ahead, some of the prospects are good for improved healthcare with a clearer understanding of the value of innovation. The European Health Data Space initiative aims to make the most of the potential of data and digitalisation to improve treatment, healthcare delivery and quality of life outcomes, by allowing health data to flow seamlessly to wherever it’s needed: between hospitals inside a country, but also between countries. 

Advertisement

Genomic data can be invaluable to help diagnose rare diseases in patients, and massive stores of anonymized patient data can also be used to help drive disease research using machine learning tools. For patients and physicians there are more options, durable clinical benefit, reduced exposure to non-effective drugs and potential to leverage current scientific and technological advances. For the private sector, the potential to tackle core challenges in discovering and developing more effective medicines, to reduce rates of attrition in drug development, and to reduce the associated escalating costs which are central to a more sustainable future and delivery for healthcare needs.


And for healthcare systems and payers, improved efficiency through the provision of efficacious and cost-effective care through the avoidance of ineffective and redundant interventions, are again key to a more. sustainable and deliverable future system. For institutions and member states it could mean more purposeful discussion – taking more account of input from stakeholders, avoiding repetition, and translating decisions into action... 

At the level that matters most to everyone, their own personal interest, a recalibration of policy towards the patient could not only improve health, but restore faith in Europe itself, providing that the process is based on trust among all stakeholders. The most obvious need, given the current level of fragmentation of policy and practice, is – as was frequently argued throughout the conference - for a new degree of coherence.

Advertisement

And on this occasion, the conference caught the mood of the moment particularly aptly with its focus on "how to make it happen".  There was a general recognition that the fragmentation still hampering Europe's health-care needed to be replaced with a new degree of coherence.

Once again, the full report from the 17 September conference is available here.

Public consultation in preparation of pharma legislation overhaul

From today (29 September), the Commission wants to hear from citizens and interested parties regarding gaps in the bloc’s medicines regulation.

Contributions from all stakeholders and interested parties are welcome. This includes, for example, associations representing patients, health care professionals, the industry, as well as academic bodies. Citizens are also welcome to contribute to this consultation. Objective of the consultation These measures relate to: Manufacture, placing on the market of medicinal products and related inspections. 

Import, export, transit (transhipment) of medicinal products. Manufacture, placing on the market of active substances and related inspections. 

For the purpose of this public consultation, which concentrates on sectoral pharmaceutical EU-legislation, the Commission has identified three areas of regulation of medicinal products where improvements to the regulatory framework could make a real contribution to protecting against counterfeit medicinal products. The Directorate-General Enterprise and Industry is consulting all stakeholders and interested parties on key ideas for amending the regulatory framework for medicinal products.

The EU plans to overhaul pharmaceutical legislation to tackle some of the most pressing issues in pharmaceuticals — many of which have been laid bare by the coronavirus pandemic. These include drug-supply issues, the need for medical treatments where none exist, and the dwindling efficacy of antibiotics.

Feedback on plans to update the EU’s pharmaceutical legislation, which has not been changed in 20 years, begins with a questionnaire seeking views from across the sector.

“A regulatory framework for pharmaceuticals, which is modernized and fit for purpose, is a key element of a strong European Health Union and crucial to addressing the many challenges this sector is facing,” Health Commissioner Stella Kyriakides said in a statement.

The public questionnaire is open until 21 December, after which the Commission will finalize the legislative proposals with a view to adopting proposed new legislation in the fourth quarter of 2022.

Kyriakides defends her HERA

Health Commissioner Stella Kyriakides tried to sell HERA — the emergency response non agency bypassing the Parliament — to the health committee on Monday (27 September). 

The COVID-19 pandemic exposed deep-rooted weaknesses in the EU's capacity to act in a health crisis - largely because its competencies are limited in this field. But the European Commission is now using the sense of urgency of exiting the health crisis as the rationale to fast-track the creation of a new EU-wide health body, HERA - excluding the European Parliament from the legislative process. 

The new Health Emergency preparedness and Response Authority (HERA) will research and identify potential cross-border health emergencies, ensure the availability of medicines and treatments by increasing EU procurement, and facilitate coordination among member states. 

HERA will not be a skilled EU agency per se, but rather a part of the commission's internal services, governed by representatives from each member state. The European Parliament, however, would only be able to take part in the executive board as an 'observer' - a move that has triggered outrage from MEPs who demand more power beyond budgetary control.

For the commission, using this legal formula (formally known as a council regulation) was the only possibility to respond quickly to the existing threats posed by the pandemic and other diseases. 

"This was never about exclusion but about moving quickly for HERA to be operating immediately," Health Commissioner Stella Kyriakides told MEPs in the health committee on Monday (27 September). 

She also justified the commission's decision, arguing that making HERA an EU agency would have taken up to three years of inter-institutional discussions. 

But MEPs rejected this argument, claiming that they have demonstrated during the pandemic how fast the parliament can react to adopt measures in times of crisis. 

"We have shown in the parliament the capacity to deliver quick results in the past, and we need that to build for the long term, so why is the European Parliament not given a full seat in the HERA board?," socialist MEP Jytte Guteland asked. 

Echoing the same message, liberal MEP Véronique Trillet–Lenoir reiterated her "disappointment and frustration" with the proposal. She said that reducing the parliament to an observer at the new authority was not aligned with "the spirit of unity and co-operation".

Europe’s Beating Cancer Plan under scrutiny 

Europe’s cancer plan was broadly welcomed on Monday by EU countries, from MEPs to national lawmakers, but several key concerns were repeatedly flagged during a meeting hosted by the BECA cancer committee. Europe's Beating Cancer Plan is intended to be supported by actions spanning across policy areas from employment, education, social policy and equality, through marketing, agriculture, energy, the environment and climate, to transport, cohesion policy, and taxation. 

As discussed in previous updates,  the Cancer Plan is structured around four key action areas with 10 flagship initiatives and multiple supporting actions. It will be implemented using the whole range of Commission funding instruments, with a total of €4 billion being earmarked for actions addressing cancer, including from the EU4Health programme, Horizon Europe and the Digital Europe programme. 

In addition, a new ‘Cancer Diagnostic and Treatment for All' initiative will be launched by the end of 2021 to help improve access to innovative cancer diagnosis and treatments and a European Initiative to Understand Cancer (UNCAN.eu) will help identify individuals at high risk from common cancers. 

A ‘Better Life for Cancer Patients Initiative' will also be launched, focusing on follow-up care. 

EU leaders aim for deal on tech regulation by next spring

The European Council “invites the co-legislators to continue work on the Digital Services Act and the Digital Market Act proposals with a view to reaching agreement by spring 2022,” the early draft regulation states.

The goal of wrapping up both bills in the first half of 2022, when France takes over the Council’s rotating presidency, has been articulated earlier by MEPs and Commission officials, but the bills weren’t mentioned during Commission President Ursula Von der Leyen’s State of the European Union address earlier this month.

The next European Council summit is scheduled for October 21.

Good news to finish: France to double COVID vaccine doses for poorer countries 

France will double the number of vaccine doses it will send to poorer countries to 120 million, President Emmanuel Macron pledged on Saturday (25 September), in a video broadcast during the Global Citizen concert in Paris. “The injustice is that in other continents, obviously, vaccination is very late,” he said. 

“We have to go faster, stronger. “France pledges to double the number of doses it is giving,” he added. “We will pass from 60 million to 120 million doses offered.” That amounted to more than the doses so far administered in France, he said. 

On Wednesday, the United States announced that it would be doubling its donation of vaccine doses, bringing its total contribution to 1.1 billion. 

President Joe Biden described the pandemic as an “all-hands-on-deck crisis”, adding “we need other high-income countries to deliver on their own ambitions”. The European Union has committed to distributing 500 million doses.

That is it, have a good week and the the full report from the 17 September conference is available here.

Share this article:

European Alliance for Personalised Medicine

EAPM: Virtual conference around the corner, In-Vitro Diagsnostic – Rocky road ahead!

Published

on

Good morning, and welcome to the latest update from the European Alliance for Personalised Medicine (EAPM). The upcoming virtual EAPM conference is just around the corner, we have an update on the Health Union Council conclusions and progress in Romania on coronavirus vaccinations, writes EAPM Executive Director Dr. Denis Horgan.

Regulation of the European Parliament and EAPM
virtual conference

Next week, on 27 October, a virtual conference/webinar will take place, run by EAPM. The banner title is 'A destination in sight: Doing it right to bring personalised healthcare to patients’. We would take this opportunity to invite you to join us for this key event – more than 100 delegates are registered for the global conference from countries such as China, Japan, Brazil, Egypt, Canada, Ghana, US and of course the EU. You can register here and click on the link to view the agenda here.

The event is divided into four distinct roundtables that will focus on a specific region – these round tables are looking at how regions are facilitating bringing personalized medicine into the health-care system.

Advertisement
  • 08.00 – 10.30 CET: Asian round table – Asia - A destination in sight: Doing it right to bring personalised healthcare to patients
  • 11.00 – 13.00 CET: Middle East round table – Middle East & Africa- A destination in sight: Doing it right to bring personalised health care to patients
  • 14.00 – 16.00 CET: Europe round table – A destination in sight: Doing it right to bring personalised health care to patients
  • 16.30 – 19.00 CET: Americas round table A destination in sight: Doing it right to bring personalised health care to patients

You can register here and click on the link to view the agenda here.

In-vitro diagnostic sector - proposed delay to new EU rules

Amid concerns of a market collapse and a "grave shortage" of notified body capacity, the European Commission on Thursday proposed to delay the implementation of certain aspects of the In Vitro Diagnostic Medical Devices Regulation (IVDR). The medical device industry has long pushed for the EU to delay IVDR, warning that the new regulation is more disruptive to the market for diagnostics than its counterpart Medical Devices Regulation (MDR), which itself was delayed by one year a month before its original date of application in May 2020 due to COVID-19.

EAPM engaged with its stakeholders to understand these challenges. Some of these are outlined below.

Advertisement


The testing timetable

A remorseless mathematics is imposing itself on current attempts to adapt in time to the new rules. It takes more than 12 months to certify and get tests to bring a product to the market.  It takes 6-12 months for the manufacturer to prepare a technical file, and it takes 3-6 months for manufacturer and notified body to conduct a pre-conformity assessment and sign a contract. A notified body needs 9-12 months to generate a conformity assessment class B and C, with an additional time 4 months for certain categories, and 6 months for a companion diagnostic. Issuing the certificate takes the notified body 1 month. Then for the manufacturer to produce and market the device and for it to pass through the supply chain to the healthcare system and on to patients takes 6 months in the EU and 9-12 months or longer for international markets. These timelines can be subject to further delay because of the impact of the pandemic on human resources, studies and on-site audits, as well as the uncertainty for industry and notified bodies resulting from the lack of crucial EU-level guidance and the under-capacity of notified bodies, with many manufacturers waiting for their notified body to be designated. 

In consequence, for IVDs which rely on CE-marking, some tests will be certified on time. But many other IVD tests will not be certified on time – and these will need to come off the market or seek national derogations through new uncertainties. As an indicator of the gravity of the problem, in February 2021, 78% of IVD companies reported issues starting or completing certification. 

Threats to innovation

Longer term, an obstacle to innovation looms. If labs, health institutions and even companies developing their own tests in novel areas are required to obtain certification through what are currently uncertain – but certainly more onerous - processes, they may be discouraged from pursuing their studies, and innovation will be negatively impacted. Experts in the field suggest that molecular oncology itself is at risk.

There is a particular risk in the high number of LDTs that may be lost through IVDR, and this, said one researcher, "means losing a lot of innovation in human genetics." In what is a varied landscape for approval of testing in Europe, NGS testing for certain cancers is becoming broadly available, but validated in ways that would not meet IVDR requirements. Another participant concerned over the risks to innovation from inappropriate regulation commented that "NGS is here to stay and IVDR should recognise that." A company specialising in tests to monitor drug performance also warned that "the short timeline to a hard stop kills the motivation for new tests." And further cautions were expressed about the risk that the likely prioritisation for certification of existing products is likely to relegate work on innovative products to the back burner.

Lack of guidance

Many stakeholders expressed concern over the lack of clear guidance on the implications of the legislation, and on operational decision-making in the choice and use of tests. Among the key conclusions to emerge from the case examples were the need for guidelines on which technique to use in particular indications. .Guidelines would be valuable on specific mutations, for HTA as well as for certification, to provide a reference for common understanding at national, EU and international level. There is wide support for the development of consensus on a collective way of moving forward. The cases highlighted issues such as the pressure that is likely to emerge for clinicians to use a commercially available test that becomes available with a CE mark, even when it may not necessarily be better in terms of sensivity or specificity, as an LDT already successfully in use. As some stakeholders argue, it is good to move forward with some good in-house tests – and EU guidelines could clarify just which tests those should be. There is not a regulation that can cover every clinical scenario, it was argued. In addition, guidelines on what justifies one or another test will provide a greater degree of security for clinicians, and for patients.

Systemic ambiguities

As a patient representative pointed out – from bitter personal experience – the challenges in diagnosis are urgent not only in terms of technology availability, but also in terms of "the human factor", with significant gaps in training and awareness. His remarks reflected a widely-shared perception that diagnostics suffers from a high degree of incoherence across Europe and across medical disciplines and specialities, aggravated by divergent approaches to value definition of diagnostic tests and to their integration into healthcare and reimbursement systems. In many cases, the potential patient benefit – and healthcare system savings - from earlier diagnosis are ignored in evaluating tests. The relative autonomy of member state decision-making on diagnostic testing compounds the problems, it is argued, and makes it all the more important in the context of IVDR to strengthen the degree of coordination between national and EU levels. Overall, patients criticise the level of patient involvement in decision-making in diagnostics as insufficient. "It will be good to see quality and safety improved by IVDR," said the patient advocate, "but availability and reimbursement will not be solved by this."

In other news....

Health Union Council conclusions

The draft Council conclusions on the European Health union, put together by the Presidency, will be presented later this week in an informal videoconference of the Working Party on Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices.

Even before the coronavirus, much of Europe grappled with chronic staffing shortfalls in its health systems. It’s little wonder then that the conclusions seek support “for capacity building of professionals working in health authorities and on health systems, in particular for those in the early stages of their careers.” The draft conclusions invite member countries and the Commission “to further explore how the EU, in the context of the stronger European Health Union, could have a more strategic approach in global health and demonstrate a leadership role in the current post-pandemic negotiations at global level.” 

Commission launches consultation on AI liability

The Commission has launched a public consultation on the rules on compensation for damage caused by defective products. A specific focus will be on the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in products and services. The Commission invites interested parties to express their views on the revision of the Product Liability Directive and on whether other national liability rules still provide legal certainty and consumer protection in an age of smart and AI-based products and services. This is especially important since the safety of these products and services does not depend only on their design and production, but also on software updates, data flows and algorithms. The public consultation covers questions such as which economic operator should be liable for harm. Another important aspect is the upgrade and refurbishment of products and components, something that is becoming more and more important in our transition to a circular economy.

Romania demands help from EU to fight coronavirus

Romania has activated the EU’s civil protection mechanism, which provides help in emergency situations, and requested enough doses of monoclonal antibody drugs to treat 40,000 patients with COVID-19, the country’s health ministry announced today (20 October). 

The request follows a phone call between Health Minister Attila Cseke and Health Commissioner Stella Kyriakides on Thursday. According to the minister, a number of countries have promised aid. 

Romania is the second-least vaccinated country in the EU, with only 33 percent of its population having received at least one shot. It’s also dealing with its worst wave of coronavirus infections up until now, with over 700 daily new cases per million people. 

The European Commission said that so far it is has delivered 5,200 vials of antibody drugs to Romania, sent from Italy, as well as 200 oxygen concentrators from the rescEU medical reserves, hosted in the Netherlands, and 50 oxygen concentrators from Poland. Denmark will be sending 15 ventilators and eight oxygen concentrators.

And that is all from EAPM for this week – don’t forget, you can register for the 27 October EAPM conference here and click on the link to view the agenda here. Stay safe, have an excellent weekend, see you next week.

Share this article:

Continue Reading

European Alliance for Personalised Medicine

Global Virtual conference around the corner on PM, delay on IVDR, HTA Update, 1,537 Amendments on European Parliament cancer report

Published

on

Good afternoon, and welcome to the latest update from the European Alliance for Personalised Medicine (EAPM), in which we touch on the upcoming virtual EAPM conference, the delay in IVDR and progress being made on cancer, writes EAPM Executive Director Dr. Denis Horgan.

Global Virtual conference on PM - Register now!

On 27 October, a virtual conference/webinar will take place, run by EAPM. The banner title is 'A destination in sight: Doing it right to bring personalised healthcare to patients’. We would take this opportunity to invite you to join us for this key event.  You can register here and click on the link to view the agenda here.

The coronavirus outbreak provides health stakeholders with an unparalleled opportunity to examine and emphasise the importance of resilient health systems. 

Advertisement

Given the current global attention to the demands of an adequate health-care system and the heightened interest in public health in general, this virtual conference will address what can be done to ensure that the health systems are resilient enough to not only handle shocks like a global pandemic but also respond those underlying forces that are shaping healthcare needs of cancer patients. 

The event is divided into four distinct roundtables that will focus on a specific region – these round tables are looking at how regions are facilitating bringing personalized medicine into the health-care system.

  • 08.00 – 10.30 CET: Asian round table – Asia - A destination in sight: Doing it right to bring personalised healthcare to patients 
  • 11.00 – 13.00 CET: Middle East round table – Middle East & Africa- A destination in sight: Doing it right to bring personalised health care to patients 
  • 14.00 – 16.00 CET: Europe round table – A destination in sight: Doing it right to bring personalised health care to patients 
  • 16.30 – 19.00 CET: Americas round table A destination in sight: Doing it right to bring personalised health care to patients 

You can register here and click on the link to view the agenda here.

Advertisement

Commission delays IVDR start by three to five years

The European Commission has proposed extending the deadline for switching to new in-vitro medical devices rules — including for COVID-19 tests — to avoid supply shortages.

“Shortages at this point in time are unthinkable,” Stella Kyriakides, Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, said in a statement.

The In Vitro Diagnostic Medical Devices Regulation was due to apply from May 26, 2022. But there is a serious shortage in the capacity of notified bodies to certify all existing products on the market.  That’s made it impossible for manufacturers to conduct the legally required conformity assessment procedures in time.

The extension to the application of the new certifying rules will now vary depending on the type of IVD product, the Commission said.

Higher risk devices such as HIV or hepatitis tests (class D) and certain influenza tests (class C), will now have a transition period until May 2025 and 2026, respectively, while lower risk ones such as class B and A sterile devices, have a transition period until May 2027.  This would lead to significant test shortages at a time of unprecedented demand, with COVID-19 tests falling into IVD test categories. Most at risk are smaller companies, the lobby group said: “The COVID-19 pandemic has shown how essential it is to have accurate diagnostics and a robust regulatory framework for in vitro medical devices.”

These are issues that the European Alliance for Personalised Medicine have put forward over the last months which will be brought to the attention of policy makers. 

It was highlighted during EAPM  expert panels that overall, across the diagnostics sector – and that includes authorities as well as laboratories and manufacturers - significant gaps remain in the necessary preparations, with the risk (and even the inevitability, in some cases) that supply difficulties will emerge, delaying clinicians' access to testing and patients' access to accurate care. "The number of notified bodies is insufficient and they do not have enough of the right staff" is a frequent complaint. 

Manufacturers are already finding difficulty in identifying a notified body for some of their products, and there is particular scarcity of expert panels to provide certification for the more advanced IVDs, as well as insufficient EU reference laboratories. And there are neither clear guidelines on many areas of decision-making, nor wide consensus on possible solutions to the challenges the regulation poses. 

The EU has deliberately provided measures in the 2017 legislation that were designed to ensure a smooth transition and to avoid market disruption. However, those measures now appear insufficient, and the transition is not likely to be smooth. Success depends on a functioning regulatory system being in place. 

Since that is manifestly not the case at present, it is unsurprising that operating under IVDR with Europe's inadequate infrastructure has been likened to sailing a boat while it is being built.

EAPM will be reviewing this revised proposal from the Commission over the next weeks. 

European Parliament Cancer report amendments take centre stage - 1,537 Amendments...

MEPs in the European Parliament’s cancer committee gathered on Thursday (14 October) to discuss proposed amendments to the draft cancer report authored by French MEP Véronique Trillet-Lenoir (Renew Europe). Cancer Committee Chair Bartosz Arłukowicz noted the large number of proposed amendments — 1,537 — as indicating the interest in the report and the need for the committee. 

“We need to make sure that this document is as precise as possible and clearly delineating the path forward,” he said.

As far as EAPM is concerned, we are following the situation closely and working continuously with the European Parliament. EAPM will be reviewing all amendments made and working relevant MEPs with respect to finding a consolidated and compromise approach. 

Of course, diagnostics, public health genomics, real world evidence, access and lung cancer screening as well as prostate cancer screening are high on our political agenda.

Health Technology Assessment

Before the end of the year, the European Parliament is expected to vote in plenary to endorse Europe’s Health Technology Assessment Regulation that was agreed in June between the parliament and Council.

A new EU HTA consortium has been set up and recently won a Commission contract to develop the methodology to perform EU health technology assessments. The EUnetHTA 21 consortium comprises 13 HTA bodies from across the bloc, and it has two years to come up with an assessment that works for all.

Following in the footsteps of medicines regulation, Europe’s HTA bodies have also set up a voluntary Head of Agencies Group that will serve as a support network as work on implementation progresses.

Next year, the Commission will establish a co-ordination group to devise the infrastructure for the new system. National systems also need to prepare how to integrate the new regulation. But there is still time; it comes into effect in 2025.

Conclusions on health union focus on medicines

A version of the ‘Draft Council conclusions on strengthening a European Health Union’, dated 13 October, focuses on drug repurposing, anti-microbial resistance and pharmaceutical resilience, among other topics.

Supply chain challenges that lead to reduced access and availability of medical products, which have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, is another area of focus for the agency. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) intends to work with the member states, the Commission, the Parliament, other EU Agencies and patients and healthcare professionals to find ways to improve access and availability, which are today a daily issue across all therapeutic areas.
 
Integrating digital technology into regulatory processes is another goal of the agency, according to the report, with a focus on integration with external stakeholders to create a seamless platform for the Network within the next five years.

The draft conclusions invite the Commission to assess the potential benefit of organizing EU-level public not-for-profit manufacturing of antimicrobial drugs in cases of “in the case of lack of commercial interest.”

They also call on both member countries and the Commission to “support further the elaboration and piloting of a ‘pull’ incentive mechanism for antibiotic procurement in the EU”.

Good news to finish - India to allow foreign tourists after 19 months 

India is set to reopen its borders to overseas travellers as it relaxes Covid-related restrictions amid a drop in daily infections.  Starting Friday, the country will grant tourist visas to travellers arriving on chartered flights.  The facility will be extended to those arriving on commercial flights from 15 November.  Foreign tourists who land in India on Friday will be the first to come into the country in 19 months.  

And that is all from EAPM for this week – don’t forget, you can register for the 27 October EAPM conference here and click on the link to view the agenda here. Stay safe, have an excellent weekend, see you next week.

Share this article:

Continue Reading

European Alliance for Personalised Medicine

Innovation in genomics services and a global framework to realize this - EAPM Presidency Conference on 27 October – Register now!

Published

on

On 27 October, a virtual conference/webinar will take place run by the European Alliance for Personalised Medicine(EAPM). 

The banner title is 'A destination in sight:  Doing it right to bring personalised healthcare to patients’.  

We would like to take this opportunity to invite you to join us for this key event. You can register here and click on the link to view the agenda here.  

The coronavirus outbreak provides health stakeholders with an unparalleled opportunity to examine and emphasize the importance of resilient health systems. 

Given the current global attention to the demands of an adequate healthcare system and the heightened interest in public health in general, this online conference will address what can be done to ensure that the health systems are resilient enough to not only handle shocks like a global pandemic but also respond those underlying forces that are shaping healthcare needs of cancer patients. 

The event is divided into four distinct round tables that will focus on a specific region at the following time which includes.

Advertisement

·       08.00 – 10.30 CET: Asian Roundtable

·       11.00 – 13.00 CET: Middle East Roundtable

·       14.00 – 16.00 CET: Europe Roundtable

Advertisement

·       16.30 – 19.00 CET: Americas Roundtable

All times are in Central European times so you would need to take account of this in your respective timezone. 

On top of this, we will discuss the implications for personalised health, and how such solutions can be used to manage public health, diagnose and treat diseases as well as predict ill-health and how such solutions can be part of the toolbox to rebuild healthcare systems after the pandemic.  The conference takes a look at this landscape and will discuss a policy framework to facilitate and empower healthcare systems. The framework will look at the following issues:

·       Governance

·       Reimbursement • Infrastructure

·       Awareness

·       Privacy

·       Collaboration

·       Technology

Participants will hear from a variety of experts from the different regions globally, all of which aim to explore how governments can allocate resources between competing public health demands, and how available technologies can help.

We expect to use the discussions as a potential framework for generating policy dialogue between different regions.

Once again, we hope you will join us on 27 October and you can register here and click on the link to view the agenda here.  

For more information, please contact Dr. Denis Horgan, PhD, LLM, MSc, BCL
EAPM executive director, chief editor, Public Health Genomics EAPM, Avenue de l'Armee/ Legerlaan 10,1040 Brussels, Belgium T: + 386 30 607 281
Website

Share this article:

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending