Connect with us

Copyright legislation

Commission calls on member states to comply with EU rules on copyright in the Digital Single Market

SHARE:

Published

on

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you've consented to and to improve our understanding of you. You can unsubscribe at any time.

The Commission has requested Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Greece, Spain, Finland, France, Croatia, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Latvia, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Sweden, Slovenia and Slovakiato communicate information about how the rules included in the Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market (Directive 2019/790/EU) are being enacted into their national law. The European Commission has also requested Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czechia, Estonia, Greece, Spain, Finland, France, Croatia, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Latvia, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia and Slovakiato communicate information about how Directive 2019/789/EU on online television and radio programmes is enacted into their national law.

As the member states above have not communicated national transposition measures or have done it only partially, the Commission decided today to open infringement procedures by sending letters of formal notice. The two Directives aim to modernise EU copyright rules and to enable consumers and creators to make the most of the digital world. They reinforce the position of creative industries, allow for more digital uses in core areas of society, and facilitate the distribution of radio and television programmes across the EU. The deadline for transposing these Directives into national legislation was 7 June 2021. These member states now have two months to respond to the letters and take the necessary measures. In the absence of a satisfactory response, the Commission may decide to issue reasoned opinions.

Advertisement

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Copyright legislation

New EU copyright rules that will benefit creators, businesses and consumers start to apply

Published

on

Today (7 June) marks the deadline for member states to transpose the new EU copyright rules into national law. The new Copyright Directive protects creativity in the digital age, bringing concrete benefits to citizens, the creative sectors, the press, researchers, educators and cultural heritage institutions across the EU. At the same time, the new Directive on television and radio programmes will make it easier for European broadcasters to make certain programmes on their online services available across borders. Furthermore, today, the Commission has published its guidance on Article 17 of the new Copyright Directive, which provides for new rules on content-sharing platforms. The two Directives, which entered into force in June 2019, aim to modernise EU copyright rules and to enable consumers and creators to make the most of the digital world, where music streaming services, video-on-demand platforms, satellite and IPTV, news aggregators and user-uploaded-content platforms have become the main gateways to access creative works and press articles. The new rules will stimulate the creation and dissemination of more high-value content and allow for more digital uses in core areas of society, while safeguarding freedom of expression and other fundamental rights. With their transposition at national level, EU citizens and businesses can start benefitting from them. A press release, a Q&A on the new EU Copyright rules, and a Q&A on the Directive on television and radio programmes are available online.

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Broadband

Time for the #EuropeanUnion to close longstanding #digital gaps

Published

on

The European Union recently unveiled its European Skills Agenda, an ambitious scheme to both upskill and reskill the bloc’s workforce. The right to lifelong learning, enshrined in the European Pillar of Social Rights, has taken on new importance in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. As Nicolas Schmit, the Commissioner for Jobs and Social Rights, explained: “The skilling of our workforces is one of our central responses to the recovery, and providing people the chance to build the skillsets they need is key to preparing for the green and digital transitions”.

Indeed, while the European bloc has frequently made headlines for its environmental initiatives—particularly the centrepiece of the Von der Leyen Commission, the European Green Deal—it’s allowed digitalisation to fall somewhat by the wayside. One estimate suggested that Europe utilizes only 12% of its digital potential. To tap into this neglected area, the EU must first address the digital inequalities in the bloc’s 27 member states are addressed.

The 2020 Digital Economy and Society Index (DESI), an annual composite assessment summarizing Europe’s digital performance and competitiveness, corroborates this claim. The latest DESI report, released in June, illustrates the imbalances which have left the EU facing a patchwork digital future. The stark divisions revealed by DESI’s data—splits between one member state and the next, between rural and urban areas, between small and large firms or between men and women—make it abundantly clear that while some parts of the EU are prepared for the next generation of technology, others are lagging significantly behind.

A yawning digital divide?

DESI evaluates five principal components of digitalization—connectivity, human capital, the uptake of Internet services, firms’ integration of digital technology, and the availability of digital public services. Across these five categories, a clear rift opens up between the highest-performing countries and those languishing at the bottom of the pack. Finland, Malta, Ireland and the Netherlands stand out as star performers with extremely advanced digital economies, while Italy, Romania, Greece and Bulgaria have a lot of ground to make up.

This overall picture of a widening gap in terms of digitalization is borne out by the report’s detailed sections on each of these five categories. Aspects such as broadband coverage, internet speeds, and next-generation access capability, for example, are all critical for personal and professional digital use—yet parts of Europe are falling short in all of these areas.

Wildly divergent access to broadband

Broadband coverage in rural areas remains a particular challenge—10% of households in Europe’s rural zones are still not covered by any fixed network, while 41% of rural homes are not covered by next generation-access technology. It’s not surprising, therefore, that significantly fewer Europeans living in rural areas have the basic digital skills they need, compared to their compatriots in larger cities and towns.

While these connectivity gaps in rural areas are troubling, particularly given how important digital solutions like precision farming will be for making the European agricultural sector more sustainable, the problems aren’t limited to rural zones. The EU had set a goal for at least 50% of households to have ultrafast broadband (100 Mbps or faster) subscriptions by the end of 2020.  According to the 2020 DESI Index, however, the EU is well short of the mark: only 26% of European households have subscribed to such fast broadband services. This is a problem with take-up, rather than infrastructure—66.5% of European households are covered by a network able to provide at least 100 Mbps broadband.

Yet again, there’s a radical divergence between the frontrunners and the laggards in the continent’s digital race. In Sweden, more than 60% of households have subscribed to ultrafast broadband—while in Greece, Cyprus and Croatia less than 10% of households have such rapid service.

SMEs falling behind

A similar story plagues Europe’s small and medium enterprises (SMEs), which represent 99% of all businesses in the EU. A mere 17% of these firms use cloud services and only 12% use big data analytics. With such a low rate of adoption for these important digital tools, European SMEs risk falling behind not only companies in other countries—74% of SMEs in Singapore, for example, have identified cloud computing as one of the investments with the most measurable impact on their business—but losing ground against larger EU firms.

Larger enterprises overwhelmingly eclipse SMEs on their integration of digital technology—some 38.5% of large firms are already reaping the benefits of advanced cloud services, while 32.7% are relying on big data analytics. Since SMEs are considered the backbone of the European economy, it’s impossible to imagine a successful digital transition in Europe without smaller firms picking up the pace.

Digital divide between citizens

Even if Europe manages to close these gaps in digital infrastructure, though, it means little
without the human capital to back it up. Some 61% of Europeans have at least basic digital skills, though this figure falls alarmingly low in some member states—in Bulgaria, for example, a mere 31% of citizens have even the most basic software skills.

The EU has still further trouble equipping its citizens with the above-basic skills which are increasingly becoming a prerequisite for a wide range of job roles. Currently, only 33% of Europeans possess more advanced digital skills. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) specialists, meanwhile, make up a meager 3.4% of the EU’s total workforce—and only 1 out of 6 are women. Unsurprisingly, this has created difficulties for SMEs struggling to recruit these highly-in-demand specialists. Some 80% of companies in Romania and Czechia reported problems trying to fill positions for ICT specialists, a snag which will undoubtedly slow down these countries’ digital transformations.

The latest DESI report lays out in stark relief the extreme disparities which will continue to thwart Europe’s digital future until they are addressed. The European Skills Agenda and other programs intended to prepare the EU for its digital development are welcome steps in the right direction, but European policymakers should lay out a comprehensive scheme to bring the entire bloc up to speed. They have the perfect opportunity to do so, too—the €750 billion recovery fund proposed to help the European bloc get back on its feet after the coronavirus pandemic. European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen has already stressed that this unprecedent investment must include provisions for Europe’s digitalization: the DESI report has made it clear which digital gaps must be addressed first.

Continue Reading

Business Information

#GDPR compliance: Manetu to the rescue?

Published

on

On 11 March, Swedish regulators slapped Google with a $7.6 million fine for failing to adequately respond to customers’ requests to have their personal information removed from the search engine’s listings. The penalty was the ninth-highest since the EU’s watershed General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) kicked into force in May 2018--yet it paled in comparison to the €50 million fine French data protection authorities hit Google with in January 2019.

To make matters worse, less than a week after the Swedish decision, one of Google’s smaller rivals filed a GDPR complaint with Irish regulators. The rival firm, open-source web browser Brave, alleges that the tech giant has failed to collect specific consent for sharing consumers’ data across its various services, and that its privacy policies are “hopelessly vague”. The latest complaint means that Google’s data collection practices are currently facing three open investigations by Irish privacy authorities.

Nor is Google the only company to face increased scrutiny over the management of its customers’ data. While the GDPR has netted some €114 million in fines so far, regulators across the European Union are itching to enforce the sweeping privacy regulations more thoroughly. Companies, for their part, simply aren’t prepared. Nearly two years after the GDPR entered into force, some 30% of European firms are still out of lockstep with the regulation, while surveys of European and North American executives have identified privacy risk monitoring as one of the most serious issues affecting their firms.

Advertisement

Despite spending billions of euro on lawyers and data protection consultants, many companies which process and retain consumer data—in practice, nearly all businesses— have not have developed a clear plan to ensure they are fully compliant with cutting-edge privacy legislation like the GDPR. Even the majority of companies which have been certified compliant are concerned that they will be unable to maintain their compliance long-term.

Among the particularly thorny issues firms are grappling with are how to pull together all the data they hold on any given consumer—and how to modify or remove that data following a customer request under the GDPR or similar legislation, such as California’s Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).

A variety of start-ups, however, are springing up to offer innovative solutions to ease the burden of complying with increasingly strict privacy legislation. The latest, Manetu, is set to roll out its Consumer Privacy Management (CPM) software in April. The software uses machine learning and correlation algorithms to pull together any personally identifiable information which businesses are holding onto—including some data which they may not even be aware of. Consumers can then access the system to manage the permissions they’ve granted for their data, including at a highly granular level.

Advertisement




At the core of Manetu’s approach is the notion that giving consumers greater control over their data—a pillar of legislation like the GDPR—is good both for customers and for businesses. As CEO Moiz Kohari explained, “Putting consumers in control isn’t just the right thing to do. Ultimately, it’s good business. Treat your customers well is an old mantra, and it’s still a great one. But in today’s world, we also need to treat their data right. Do that, and you’ll earn a bond of trust that will pay dividends for a long time.”

In addition to earning customers’ trust, a more consumer-centred method of managing data can help companies optimise time and resources—both while processing data and when proving compliance with GDPR or other privacy legislation. Automating consumer requests to access, modify or delete their data drastically reduces the costs companies are currently incurring by manually addressing these requests.

In a similar way to how blockchain technology makes markets more transparent by recording all transactions in a permanent ledger, Manetu’s platform combines automation with an immutable log of exactly what permissions consumers have granted and when, and how, they have changed those permissions.

This documentation can be invaluable to companies needing to demonstrate to regulators that they are compliant with privacy regulations like the GDPR. EU rules establish, among other things, a “right to be forgotten.” Manetu’s log allows firms to both comply with “forget me” requests and prove that they’ve done so—without retaining access to information that the consumer has asked them to forget. Firms will be able to point to a comprehensive register of all the permissions users had granted or withdrawn.

The twin blows against Google—the GDPR fine imposed by Swedish authorities and the fresh investigation by Irish privacy regulators—confirm that data privacy will be one of the biggest challenges facing firms operating in Europe for the foreseeable future. It will be increasingly imperative for companies to streamline their data management processes to enable them to have the level of oversight which both regulators and consumers now expect.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending