Connect with us

Economy

Stakeholders launched a new EU-wide education scheme to help improve youth employability

SHARE:

Published

on

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you've consented to and to improve our understanding of you. You can unsubscribe at any time.

ESPEuropean youth often lack necessary job skills and entrepreneurial competences, which contributes to consistently high youth unemployment rates.  To address this problem, a group of policy and industry stakeholders gathered today to launch the Entrepreneurial Skills Pass (ESP), a European qualification in entrepreneurship for young people, giving potential employers proof that its holder has real entrepreneurship experience and relevant job skills.

It is hoped that this pass will help young people increase their chances of finding a job or launching their own business. The initiative was developed by JA-YE Europe, the Austrian Federal Economic Chamber (WKO), CSR Europe and the Danish Foundation For Entrepreneurship-Young Enterprise (FFE-YE) and co-funded by the European Commission with further support from a number of private enterprises.

Hosted by MEPs Petra Kammerevert (S&D, Germany) and Jutta Steinruck (S&D, Germany), the round-table discussion stressed the importance of entrepreneurship education and financial literacy programmes in helping increase youth employability.

Advertisement

MEP Petra Kammerevert opened the discussion by underlining entrepreneurial education as a much needed long-term investment:  “A shrinking and increasingly competitive job market presents a serious challenge for policy-makers. We must ensure that European youth possess all the necessary job skills that are attractive to employers or that they hold basic entrepreneurship skills that can help them become self-employed. After all, having a competent young workforce is crucial to retaining competitiveness of the EU economy as a whole."

The participants also discussed the current lack of basic financial literacy skills among youth as was demonstrated by a recent study Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) conducted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Adele Atkinson, a policy analyst at the OECD, stressed the importance of integrating financial literacy training into secondary schools’ curricula.

This was further supported by Visa Europe, which recently conducted its own research on Europeans’ entrepreneurial aspirations. “More than 50% of young people aged 18-24 said they had a good business idea. However, as many as 20% admitted they feared starting-up in business because they did not understand the financial implications of running a business. Therefore, a good financial education is essential to empower more young Europeans to become successfully self-employed, creating new jobs for their peers in the long-term,” said Nick Jones, Head of Corporate Responsibility & Digital Communications at Visa Europe.

Advertisement

It was also concluded that in order to improve financial literacy it is necessary to cultivate strong partnerships between businesses and educators. Trudy Norris-Grey, Managing Director Central & Eastern Europe, Public Sector Microsoft called for additional endorsement of ESP:

“Given high levels of youth unemployment in Europe, it is vital that we equip young people with the skills they need to succeed in the labor market. Increasingly, this means bridging the education-to-work gap. Microsoft is thrilled to be supporting JA-YE Europe with the launch of their Entrepreneurial Skills Pass. We call on both the public and private sectors to embrace the ESP as a way of placing digital entrepreneurship skills at the heart of Europe’s education systems, and ensuring that entrepreneurship becomes an essential competence in today’s workplaces.”

Caroline Jenner, CEO of JA-YE Europe reissued this Call to Action by reminding us: “It is not only young people that will benefit from the Entrepreneurial Skills Pass. Employers will also gain access to a newly qualified and talented pool of youth – enriching their workforce and fuelling the economy. That’s why we are calling for increased support from leaders and businesses. Join us by endorsing ESP today.

Economy

Sustainable urban transport takes centre stage for European Mobility Week

Published

on

Around 3,000 towns and cities across Europe are participating in this year's European Mobility Week, which started yesterday and will last until Wednesday, 22 September. The 2021 campaign has been launched under the theme ‘Safe and healthy with sustainable mobility', and will promote the use of public transport as a safe, efficient, affordable, and low-emission mobility option for everyone. 2021 is also the 20th anniversary of car-free day, from which the European Mobility Week has grown.

“A clean, smart and resilient transport system is at the core of our economies and central to people's lives. This is why, on the 20th anniversary of the European Mobility Week, I am proud of the 3,000 cities across Europe and beyond for showcasing how safe and sustainable transport options help our communities to stay connected during these challenging times,” said Transport Commissioner Adina Vălean.

For this landmark year, the European Commission has created a virtual museum showcasing the history of the week, its impact, personal stories, and how it links with the EU's broader sustainability priorities. Elsewhere, activities around Europe include bicycle festivals, exhibitions of electric vehicles and workshops. This year's event also coincides with a public consultation on the Commission's ideas for a new urban mobility framework, and the European Year of Rail with its Connecting Europe Express train.

Advertisement

Continue Reading

coronavirus

Commission approves €500,000 Portuguese scheme to further support the passenger transport sector in Azores in the context of the coronavirus outbreak

Published

on

The European Commission has approved a €500,000 Portuguese scheme to further support the passenger transport sector in the Region of the Azores in the context of the coronavirus outbreak. The measure was approved under the State Aid Temporary Framework. It follows another Portuguese scheme to support the passenger transport sector in Azores that the Commission approved on 4 June 2021 (SA.63010). Under the new scheme, the aid will take the form of direct grants. The measure will be open to collective passenger transport companies of all sizes active in the Azores. The purpose of the measure is to mitigate the sudden liquidity shortages that these companies are facing and to address losses incurred over 2021 due to the coronavirus outbreak and the restrictive measures that the government had to implement to limit the spread of the virus.

The Commission found that the Portuguese scheme is in line with the conditions set out in the Temporary Framework. In particular, the aid (i) will not exceed €1.8 million per company; and (ii) will be granted no later than 31 December 2021. The Commission concluded that the measure is necessary, appropriate and proportionate to remedy a serious disturbance in the economy of a member state, in line with Article 107(3)(b) TFEU and the conditions of the Temporary Framework. On this basis, the Commission approved the measure under EU state aid rules. More information on the Temporary Framework and other actions taken by the Commission to address the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic can be found here. The non-confidential version of the decision will be made available under the case number SA.64599 in the state aid register on the Commission's competition website once any confidentiality issues have been resolved.

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

EU collaborates with other OECD countries to propose ban on export credits for coal-fired power projects

Published

on

Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries hold an extraordinary meeting today (15 September) and Thursday (16 September) to discuss a possible ban on export credits for international coal-fired power generation projects without measures compensation. Discussions will focus on a proposal presented by the EU and other countries (Canada, Republic of Korea, Norway, Switzerland, UK and US) earlier this month. The proposal supports the greening of the global economy and is an important step in aligning the activities of export credit agencies with the goals of the Paris Agreement.

Export credits are an important part of promoting international trade. As a participant in the OECD Arrangement on Officially Supported Export Credits, the EU plays a major role in efforts to ensure a level playing field at international level and to ensure the coherence of the common objective of combating climate change. The EU has pledged to end aid for export credits for coal without offsetting measures, and at the same time commits at the international level to a just transition.

In January 2021, the Council of the European Union called for the global phasing out of environmentally damaging fossil fuel subsidies on a clear timetable and for a resolute and just global transformation. towards climate neutrality, including the gradual phase-out of coal without compensatory measures in energy production and, as a first step, the immediate end of all funding for new coal infrastructure in third countries. In its February 2021 Trade Policy Review, the European Commission pledged to propose an immediate end to export credit support for the coal-fired electricity sector.

Advertisement

In June this year, G7 members also recognized that continued global investment in non-reduction coal-fired electricity generation was inconsistent with the goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 °C and pledged to end new direct government support for global coal-fired power generation internationally by the end of 2021, including through government funding.

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending