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Aviation Strategy for Europe

Aviation safety: Commission adopts new #EUAirSafetyList

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The European Commission has updated the EU Air Safety List, the list of airlines that are subject to an operating ban or operational restrictions within the European Union as they do not meet international safety standards. The Commission wishes to ensure the highest level of air safety for all passengers travelling in the European Union.

Following today's update, all airlines certified in Armenia have been added to the list, after further assessment of the country's safety oversight capabilities. This decision follows the hearings of the Armenian Civil Aviation Committee (CAC) and six Armenian air carriers.

In addition, the list of air carriers certified in Congo (Brazzaville), Democratic Republic of Congo, Kyrgyzstan, Libya, Nepal, and Sierra Leone has been reviewed and amended, with new carriers from these countries added, and carriers which do not exist any longer removed.

Transport Commissioner Adina Vălean said: “The EU Air Safety List should be used as an instrument that helps airlines and countries listed reassess and improve their flying standards. The decision to include the Armenian carriers on the EU Air Safety List has been made based on the unanimous opinion delivered by the Air Safety Committee. The Commission, with the assistance of the European Union Aviation Safety Agency, stands ready to cooperate and invest in Armenia to improve its aviation safety.”

The EU Air Safety List not only helps to maintain high levels of safety in the EU, but also helps affected airlines and countries to improve their levels of safety, in order for them to eventually be taken off the list. In addition, the EU Air Safety List has become a major preventive tool, as it motivates countries with safety problems to act upon them before a ban under the EU Air Safety List would become necessary.

Following today's update, a total of 96 airlines are banned from EU skies:

  • 90 airlines certified in 16 states*, due to inadequate safety oversight by the aviation authorities from these states, and;
  • six individual airlines, based on serious safety deficiencies identified: Avior Airlines (Venezuela), Blue Wing Airlines (Suriname), Iran Aseman Airlines (Iran), Iraqi Airways (Iraq), Med-View Airlines (Nigeria) and Air Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe).

An additional three airlines are subject to operational restrictions and can only fly to the EU with specific aircraft types: Air Service Comores (the Comoros), Iran Air (Iran) and Air Koryo (North Korea).

Background

Today's update of the Air Safety List is based on the unanimous opinion of the aviation safety experts from the Member States who met from 12-14 May 2020 under the auspices of the EU Air Safety Committee (ASC), via videoconference. This Committee is chaired by the European Commission with the support of the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). The update equally got the support from the European Parliament's Transport Committee. Assessment is made against international safety standards, and notably the standards promulgated by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The Commission is constantly looking at ways to improve aviation safety, notably through collaborative efforts with aviation authorities worldwide to raise global safety standards.

More information

Questions & answers on the EU Air Safety List

List of airlines banned within the EU 

Importance of aviation for the European economy

EASA Technical Cooperation Projects

*Afghanistan, Angola (with the exception of 2 airlines), Armenia, Congo (Brazzaville), Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Libya, Moldova (with the exception of three airlines), Nepal, São Tomé and Príncipe, Sierra Leone and Sudan.

 

Aviation Strategy for Europe

Aviation: EU and ASEAN conclude the world's first bloc-to-bloc Air Transport Agreement

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The European Union and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) have concluded negotiations on the ASEAN-EU Comprehensive Air Transport Agreement (AE CATA). This is the world's first bloc-to-bloc air transport agreement, which will bolster connectivity and economic development among the 37 member states of ASEAN and the EU. Under the agreement, EU airlines will be able to fly up to 14 weekly passenger services, and any number of cargo services, via and beyond any ASEAN country, and vice versa. 

Transport Commissioner Adina Vălean said: “The conclusion of this first-ever ‘bloc-to-bloc' air transport agreement marks an important milestone in the EU's external aviation policy. It provides essential guarantees of fair competition for our European airlines and industry, while strengthening reciprocal prospects for trade and investment in some of the world's most dynamic markets. Importantly, this new agreement also provides us with a solid platform to continue promoting the high standards on safety, security, air traffic management, environment and social matters going forward. I am grateful for the constructive approach of all parties involved, which made this historic deal possible.” 

The Agreement will help rebuild air connectivity between ASEAN countries and Europe, which has decreased sharply due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and open up new growth opportunities for the aviation industry in both regions. Both parties expressed intent to maintain regular discussions and close coordination to minimise disruptions to air services caused by the pandemic. ASEAN and the EU will now submit the AE CATA for legal scrubbing in preparation for signature at a later date. A joint statement on the Conclusion of the ASEAN-EU Comprehensive Air Transport Agreement (AE CATA) has been published here

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Aviation Strategy for Europe

Commission approves €26 million Irish aid scheme to compensate airport operators in context of coronavirus outbreak

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The European Commission has approved, under EU state aid rules, a €26 million Irish aid scheme to compensate airport operators for the losses caused by the coronavirus outbreak and the travel restrictions imposed by Ireland to limit the spread of the coronavirus. The aid consists of three measures: (i) a damage compensation measure; (ii) an aid measure to support the airport operators up to a maximum of €1.8 million per beneficiary; and (iii) an aid measure to support the uncovered fixed costs of these companies.

The aid will take the form of direct grants. In case of support for the uncovered fixed costs, aid can also be granted in the form of guarantees and loans. The damage compensation measure will be open to operators of Irish airports that handled more than 1 million passengers in 2019. Under this measure, these operators can be compensated for the net losses suffered during the period between 1 April and 30 June 2020 as a result of the restrictive measures implemented by the Irish authorities in order to contain the spread of coronavirus.

The Commission assessed the first measure under Article 107(2)(b) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and found that it will provide compensation for damage that is directly linked to the coronavirus outbreak. It also found that the measure is proportionate, as the compensation does not exceed what is necessary to make good the damage. With regard to the other two measures, the Commission found that they are in line with the conditions set out in the state aid Temporary Framework. In particular, the aid (i) will be granted no later than 31 December 2021 and (ii) will not exceed €1.8 million per beneficiary under the second measure and will not exceed €10 million per beneficiary under the third measure.

The Commission concluded that both measures are necessary, appropriate and proportionate to remedy a serious disturbance in the economy of a member state, in line with Article 107(3)(b) TFEU and the conditions set out in the Temporary Framework. On this basis, the Commission approved the three measures under EU State aid rules. More information on the Temporary Framework and other actions taken by the Commission to address the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic can be found here. The non-confidential version of the decision will be made available under the case number SA.59709 in the state aid register on the Commission's competition website once any confidentiality issues have been resolved.

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Aviation Strategy for Europe

Aviation: Commission proposal on airport slots offers much-needed relief to sector

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The European Commission has adopted a new proposal on slot allocation that grants aviation stakeholders much-needed relief from airport slot use requirements for the summer 2021 scheduling season. While airlines normally have to use 80% of the slots awarded to them to secure their full slot portfolios for subsequent scheduling seasons, the proposal reduces this threshold to 40%. It also introduces a number of conditions aimed at ensuring airport capacity is used efficiently and without harming competition during the COVID-19 recovery period.

Transport Commissioner Adina Vălean said: “With today's proposal we seek to strike a balance between the need to provide relief to airlines, which continue to suffer from the significant drop in air travel due to the ongoing pandemic and the need to maintain competition in the market, ensure an efficient operation of airports, and avoid ghost flights. The proposed rules provide certainty for the summer season 2021 and ensure that the Commission can modulate further necessary slot waivers according to clear conditions to ensure this balance is maintained.”

Looking at the traffic forecasts for summer 2021, it is reasonable to expect that traffic levels will be at least 50% of 2019 levels. A threshold of 40% will therefore guarantee a certain level of service, while still allowing airlines a buffer in the use of their slots. The proposal on slot allocation has been transmitted to the European Parliament and Council for approval.

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